A Call to Mend, Not End the NEH

In its draft budget, the Trump administration has proposed the abolition of the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of a dramatic reduction in non-essential discretionary spending. The NEH’s budget is so small (0.004 percent of the federal budget) that its elimination would serve as a mere gesture. In fact, Trump-inspired conservatives

By | 2017-04-24T17:49:52+00:00 April 24th, 2017|

How Trump’s First Three Months Point the Way to Three Percent Growth

The great nineteenth-century man of letters William Dean Howells once made a remark that I have long cherished as a sort of personal motto: “The problem for a critic,” Howells said, “is not making enemies, but keeping them.” A critic who does not make enemies is unlikely to be doing his job, inasmuch

By | 2017-04-24T17:53:13+00:00 April 22nd, 2017|

Foolish to Choose Morning Joe Crowd Over Bannon and Voters

The empire always strikes back. And permanent Washington wants to retake the power and prestige it lost at the hands of Donald Trump over the past 18 months. The bipartisan media monopoly closed ranks in opposition to Trump and he won anyway. Desperate and discredited the same forces that opposed Trump before the

By | 2017-04-21T00:03:24+00:00 April 15th, 2017|

A Potty-Mouthed Legacy Journalist

The malignity is easy to read. “Oh, Mike Anton, I recognize your quotes and so will Jared,” tweeted the hard-line NeverTrumper John Podhoretz yesterday morning. John is the scion of two extraordinarily gifted writers, Norman Podhoretz and Midge Decter. They were liberals in the old-fashioned sense, and the intellectual founders of the neoconservative

By | 2017-04-21T00:01:18+00:00 April 14th, 2017|

Crime, the Gallows, and Trump

  In Henry Fielding’s novel Tom Jones, one Ensign Northerton quarrels with our hero and, without warning, deals him a seemingly mortal blow. Placed under arrest, the assailant begins to consider the consequences of his crime. Fielding writes that Northerton: had a great antipathy to those close winter quarters in the Castle of

By | 2017-04-21T00:01:19+00:00 April 13th, 2017|

The Pence Rule and its Discontents

As if the Washington swamp—crawling as it does with an enormous number of statutes, acts, regulations, directives, and the like—needed more of the same, we now have the “Pence Rule,” named for Vice President Mike Pence who let it be known that he “never eats alone with a woman other than his wife.”  This revelation

By | 2017-04-11T18:48:29+00:00 April 7th, 2017|

Whose Privilege Is it Anyway?

  Progressives love to celebrate America’s increasing diversity. Sounds nice, but if you stop to think about that for a moment, what they’re celebrating is the declining white portion of the U.S. population.  The headline of an opinion in Newsweek awhile back is typical: "America's Getting Less White, and That Will Save It.” "Good!" says the subtext.

By | 2017-04-08T16:28:16+00:00 April 6th, 2017|

A Return to Government by Consent: A Response to James Rogers

At the Liberty Law Blog, Professor James R. Rogers makes a sweeping claim that Americans no longer believe in the principle of consent ensconced in the Declaration of Independence. While “Americans at the Founding took seriously the idea that their consent could be conferred by their representatives,” Americans today do not. On both left and

By | 2017-04-07T16:43:03+00:00 April 4th, 2017|

Looking Down on Trump’s Brain

According to Ross Douthat, in his April 1, 2017 New York Times article, “Trump Needs a Brain”: Trump himself doesn’t know what he wants to do on major issues and there’s nobody in his innermost circle who seems to have a compelling vision that might guide him. Douthat says in an “ideologically unstable age” Trump

By | 2017-04-07T15:49:32+00:00 April 4th, 2017|