Roger Kimball

About Roger Kimball

Roger Kimball is Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion and President and Publisher of Encounter Books. Mr. Kimball lectures widely and has appeared on national radio and television programs as well as the BBC. He is represented by Writers' Representatives, who can provide details about booking him. Mr. Kimball's latest book is The Fortunes of Permanence: Culture and Anarchy in an Age of Amnesia (St. Augustine's Press, 2012). He is also the author of The Rape of the Masters (Encounter), Lives of the Mind: The Use and Abuse of Intelligence from Hegel to Wodehouse (Ivan R. Dee), and Art's Prospect: The Challenge of Tradition in an Age of Celebrity (Ivan R. Dee). Other titles by Mr. Kimball include The Long March: How the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s Changed America (Encounter) and Experiments Against Reality: The Fate of Culture in the Postmodern Age (Ivan R. Dee). Mr. Kimball is also the author ofTenured Radicals: How Politics Has Corrupted Our Higher Education (HarperCollins). A new edition of Tenured Radicals, revised and expanded, was published by Ivan R. Dee in 2008. Mr. Kimball is a frequent contributor to many publications here and in England, including The New Criterion, The Times Literary Supplement, Modern Painters, Literary Review, The Wall Street Journal, The Public Interest, Commentary, The Spectator, The New York Times Book Review, The Sunday Telegraph, The American Spectator, The Weekly Standard, National Review, and The National Interest.

Why Trump’s U.N. Speech Was a Triumph

Donald Trump on Tuesday confirmed yet again why he is the most robust president since Ronald Reagan. Following up on his brilliant speeches before a joint session of Congress in February, his speech about combating Islamic terrorism before Arab leaders in Saudi Arabia, and his splendid defense of Western civilizational values in Warsaw

By | 2017-09-20T10:35:51+00:00 September 19th, 2017|Tags: |

The Un-P.C. Reason for Labor Day

Ah, Labor Day! For many, this national holiday is chiefly a bittersweet celebratory marker: a line in the sand (preferably at some winsome beach) between the season of recreation and the seasons of toil. Summer is packing up, autumn and winter are about to schedule their arrival. Yet Labor Day is also something

By | 2017-09-07T09:04:09+00:00 September 3rd, 2017|

Inebriates of Virtue

At Yale, where censorship never sleeps, the Committee of Public Safety—no, wait, that was Robespierre’s plaything. Yale’s new bureaucracy is called the “Committee on Art in Public Spaces.” Its charge? To police works of art on campus, to make sure that images offensive to favored populations are covered over or removed. At the

By | 2017-09-04T10:20:11+00:00 September 1st, 2017|

While They Rage, Trump Builds

What’s the highest pleasure known to man? Christian theologians talk about the visio beatifica, the “beatific vision” of God. Alas, that communion is granted to very few in this life. For the common run of mankind, I suspect, the highest pleasure is moral infatuation. Like a heartbeat, moral infatuation has a systolic and diastolic

By | 2017-08-25T12:43:57+00:00 August 22nd, 2017|

America: Four Possible Futures

Back in August 2016, I was pleased to have been able to amaze the world with an important literary discovery: a hitherto unknown manuscript by the famous Japanese director Akira Kurosawa. Everyone knows about Kurosawa’s classic 1950 film Rashomon. In that clever post-modernist exercise, the sanguinary tale of the woodcutter, the bandit, the

By | 2017-08-10T20:17:36+00:00 August 8th, 2017|

The Russia House: Pope or Kafka?

Not the Pope, Francis the anti-American environmentalist Jesuit. No, I mean Alex, the 18th-century English poet. Here’s my question: Is the whole Russia-meddled-in-U.S.-election/Donald-Trump-colluded-with-Putin-to-snatch-the-presidency-from-its-rightful-owner,-H.-Clinton narrative an example of what Pope talked about at the beginning of The Rape of the Lock? What dire Offence from am'rous Causes springs, What mighty Quarrels rise from trivial

By | 2017-07-26T22:26:51+00:00 July 16th, 2017|

Donald Trump as Pericles

I have no idea who wrote the rousing speech that Donald Trump delivered Thursday in Warsaw. But I think I know who might have provided a model: Pericles of Athens. As I noted yesterday, the speech contained the usual quota of diplomacy-speak, freshened up with numerous specific advisories: the US stands behind Article

By | 2017-07-12T14:32:11+00:00 July 7th, 2017|

Trump Provokes CNN’s Self-Immolation, America Relieved

A couple of weeks ago in this space, I speculated that CNN, the Crackpot News Network, had reached the terminal stage of malevolent implausibility. “[I]t would be a good thing,” I wrote, “were CNN humiliated and sued out of existence. It performs no journalistic function, merely a destructively partisan one.” As usual, I

By | 2017-07-12T14:32:32+00:00 July 5th, 2017|

Potemkin Progressivism

It often has been observed that philosophy really got going when people started thinking seriously about the distinction between appearance, on the one hand, and reality, on the other. Plato is full of meditations on this theme, from the stick that appears bent when half submerged in a bowl of water to the

By | 2017-07-12T14:32:50+00:00 June 22nd, 2017|