Roger Kimball

About Roger Kimball

Roger Kimball is Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion and President and Publisher of Encounter Books. Mr. Kimball lectures widely and has appeared on national radio and television programs as well as the BBC. He is represented by Writers' Representatives, who can provide details about booking him. Mr. Kimball's latest book is The Fortunes of Permanence: Culture and Anarchy in an Age of Amnesia (St. Augustine's Press, 2012). He is also the author of The Rape of the Masters (Encounter), Lives of the Mind: The Use and Abuse of Intelligence from Hegel to Wodehouse (Ivan R. Dee), and Art's Prospect: The Challenge of Tradition in an Age of Celebrity (Ivan R. Dee). Other titles by Mr. Kimball include The Long March: How the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s Changed America (Encounter) and Experiments Against Reality: The Fate of Culture in the Postmodern Age (Ivan R. Dee). Mr. Kimball is also the author ofTenured Radicals: How Politics Has Corrupted Our Higher Education (HarperCollins). A new edition of Tenured Radicals, revised and expanded, was published by Ivan R. Dee in 2008. Mr. Kimball is a frequent contributor to many publications here and in England, including The New Criterion, The Times Literary Supplement, Modern Painters, Literary Review, The Wall Street Journal, The Public Interest, Commentary, The Spectator, The New York Times Book Review, The Sunday Telegraph, The American Spectator, The Weekly Standard, National Review, and The National Interest.

With the Kavanaugh Fight, Political Warfare Escalates

Scorched earth. That’s the tactic the Democrats and their enablers in the media and George Soros-funded hit squads are employing against Brett Kavanaugh. We all know it. We all experienced that sharp intake of breath when it was first reported that Dianne Feinstein had a letter from some anonymous female accusing Kavanaugh of

By | 2018-10-02T21:09:16+00:00 October 1st, 2018|

Trump’s Triumph at the U.N.

President Trump’s speech at the United Nations on Tuesday is one of the greatest political speeches ever delivered in peacetime. Maybe you are like those members of the audience seated in the General Assembly who tittered when the president began his speech noting that, “In less than two years, my administration has accomplished

By | 2018-09-26T21:01:28+00:00 September 25th, 2018|

After Kavanaugh, A Way to Take the Spectacle Out of Confirmations

Is there a silver lining in the malignant circus now playing at the Capitol and beamed to computer and television screens across the fruited plain? Depending on when you happen to read this, you might ask: “Which circus? Who’s playing this week?” Politics is by nature a performance art. The rhetor declaiming in

By | 2018-09-21T21:02:48+00:00 September 20th, 2018|

Burying the Dead With Bile-Filled Histrionics

The big news last week revolved around the funerals of a 1960s pop singer and an unreliable Republican senator with a cult following among masochistic conservatives and cynical leftists eager to capitalize on his capacity to spread dissension among his nominal allies. I suppose the exploitation of funerals for grubby political ends is

By | 2018-09-03T04:28:50+00:00 September 3rd, 2018|

Crime and Punishment

One of the reasons so many people are confused by the operations of our self-appointed fourth branch of government—I mean in this instance the unending, Kafkaesque investigations conducted by Robert Mueller and his crack team of anti-Trump shock troops—is that while we have seen plenty of punishment meted out, crimes have been rather

By | 2018-08-24T21:15:00+00:00 August 23rd, 2018|

Hillsdale’s Honor Endures a Preposterous, Vicious Attack

The conformist nature and indiscriminate animus exhibited by the hive mentality of the anti-Trump brotherhood is a marvel to behold. Future students of abnormal psychology will vie with political historians to take the measure of this exercise in narcissistic virtue signaling and cult-like tribal futility. The phenomenon would be risible if it were

By | 2018-07-28T16:01:07+00:00 July 27th, 2018|

Tom Wolfe, 1930–2018: On the Late Literary Treasure

Editor’s note: This essay appears in the June 2018 issue of the The New Criterion. It is reprinted by their kind permission.  The passing of Tom Wolfe last month at eighty-eight was met, as was appropriate, by an outpouring of affectionate commemoration. True, the praise, the enthusiasm, the fondness was here and there punctuated by some sniffy (though

By | 2018-06-07T15:45:34+00:00 June 7th, 2018|