Progression—or Degeneracy? Part One

Editor’s note: This is the first of a three-part series. The American regime that resulted from the American Revolution differs from today’s in size, scope, and character. We do not elaborate the contrasts. Rather, we ask: Whence came these differences between the former’s constitutionally limited pursuits of modest objectives—domestic tranquility, justice, the common

By | 2017-06-25T16:32:32+00:00 June 24th, 2017|

Our Crude News Network

Progressive media bias is now a given. The present generation of journalists and reporters tends to believe that just conveying the news no longer offers ample venue for their unappreciated talents, celebrity status, and deserved political influence. As a result, they often massage coverage to find relevance as makers, not mere deliverers, of

By | 2017-06-12T22:01:35+00:00 June 6th, 2017|

For Memorial Day, Some Common Sense About Our Common Purpose

“Will our Republic survive?” It is a fitting question for Memorial Day. For, as Abraham Lincoln noted in his Gettysburg Address, “It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced.” The work of preserving our freedom

By | 2017-06-01T22:06:23+00:00 May 29th, 2017|

To Hell in a Handmaid’s Basket

Unlike Norm Macdonald, I enjoyed Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale. But then again, I’m a sucker for dystopian stories. From Animal Farm, 1984, Fahrenheit 451 and Brave New World, to Kafka’s The Trial, dystopian narrative plumbs the visceral fear that individuals have in response to the rise of the modern state, especially as the

By | 2017-06-01T19:32:54+00:00 May 29th, 2017|

Memo from Manchester: Don’t Let the Swamp Win on Immigration

The excruciating facts keep on coming in. Twenty-two are dead, many of them children. About five dozen others are wounded, such that the death-toll may climb. The Islamic State jihadist network, having exhorted its willing Western-based recruits to attack in place, has claimed responsibility. And now comes the revelation that the suicide-terrorist, Salman

By | 2017-05-26T21:22:32+00:00 May 23rd, 2017|

The Delusional Press for Power of the Anti-Trump Crowd

Over the last few years, I have several times had occasion to cite Charles Mackay’s 19th-century classic Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds. The title by itself captures something essential about our situation. But the particulars of the stories Mackay tells form an engaging collage of social history quite apart from

By | 2017-05-24T20:25:17+00:00 May 19th, 2017|

Romancing Reactionaries: Andrew Sullivan, the Left, and Not Getting It

“Donald Trump is not being reasonable…. But, then, man does not live by reason alone, fortunately. Trump, who believes that excess can be a virtue, is as American as Manhattan’s skyline, which expresses the Republic’s erupting energies. He says the skyscraper is necessary because it is unnecessary. He believes architectural exuberance is good

By | 2017-05-23T22:33:20+00:00 May 19th, 2017|

No Guilt This Time

I have given up on discussing the ascendance of Donald Trump with anyone who didn’t vote for him. They are too hard in their denunciation. A mild suggestion that the Democratic Party went so far into identity politics that it pushed people toward a leader outspokenly tired of political correctness leads at most

By | 2017-05-12T22:10:07+00:00 May 9th, 2017|

Plain Talk about Law School Rot

The legal academy is a strange place. It differs from other intellectual disciplines in that legal scholarship is published mainly in student-edited law reviews, not peer-reviewed journals. Most faculty members at elite law schools have never practiced law, or have done so only briefly and usually without professional distinction. The curricula at many

By | 2017-05-12T21:26:09+00:00 May 7th, 2017|