Last Chance for France

This most unique society, which evolved gradually over millennia, with each successive generation safeguarding and conveying to future generations the distinctive patrimony of its peoplehood, is now in danger of being inundated in the tidal wave of a hostile, alien culture, which has no intention whatsoever to assimilate to the nation of France.

By | 2017-04-22T00:37:20+00:00 April 22nd, 2017|

Activists Appropriate Holiday Spirit for Political Purposes

It’s the same, every year. If our most cherished holidays aren’t denigrated falsely as pagan anachronisms, they’re indicted as examples of naked consumerism. As Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, or even Easter and Christmas roll around, one can reliably count on the chorus of cynics ever ready with limitless reserves of smug

By | 2017-04-22T20:41:12+00:00 April 20th, 2017|

Chairman of the Board Trump

  With the rise of the modern corporation, we have come to see the corporate CEO as the paradigm for leadership. We expect that Trump, the first president whose entire experience of leadership is in business, would work as we imagine today’s CEOs work, or especially the most visible CEOs, the heads of

By | 2017-04-21T00:01:18+00:00 April 13th, 2017|

Syria Strike Brings Back Lost Paradigm of Proportional Response

In the unleashing of media passions following President Trump’s strike on Syria, there were few surprises. Political pundits of the left and right who have never had a kind word to say about Trump suddenly oozed approval, offering a staggering confirmation of the power of the bipartisan war party. By contrast, those pundits

By | 2017-04-13T05:41:02+00:00 April 11th, 2017|

What’s In a Doctrine?

The Claremont Institute sponsored an event in Washington, D.C. a couple of weeks ago called “Conservatism in the Trump Era.” There, the speakers explained, in keeping with Plato’s Republic, “the foreign policy of a sensible nation is never devoted to the good of other nations, unless the good of another nation directly promotes the existence

By | 2017-04-03T05:32:04+00:00 March 25th, 2017|

In Feinstein vs. Gorsuch, Originalism Wins

Neil Gorsuch is no Robert Bork—to the great chagrin of the Senate Democrats who are trying to block his confirmation to the U.S. Supreme Court. Thirty years ago, Senate Democrats derailed Bork’s nomination, claiming the judge’s judicial philosophy of “judicial restraint” was well beyond the mainstream. Today, Democrats are looking for any reason at all

By | 2017-03-23T14:53:47+00:00 March 23rd, 2017|

Does Europe Treasure NATO Again?

It is a bit rich to hear Europeans insist that any Trump Administration doubts about NATO’s usefulness is heresy—given their occasional popular indifference to and ambiguity about the alliance. In current journalistic groupthink, Donald Trump has endangered NATO by suggesting a) it does not have a clearly defined role and needs to find one for

By | 2017-03-22T11:08:24+00:00 March 22nd, 2017|

Shootout over Natural Law at Gorsuch Gulch?

Supreme Court justices sometimes devise overly clever “tests” in their opinions to determine the constitutionality of a law or government action. Here’s my one-pronged (and multi-part) Supreme Court minimal competency test, derived from Abraham Lincoln’s critique of Chief Justice Taney’s opinion in Dred Scot: Was Lincoln right in making the Declaration of Independence the basis of constitutional government?

By | 2017-03-21T15:39:54+00:00 March 21st, 2017|

Can Activist Judges Be Controlled?

Congress failed in 1805 to impeach Justice Samuel Chase. But circumstances have changed. The disquieting spectacle of three unelected judges (all appointed by President Barack Obama) enjoining the signature initiative of the newly inaugurated President Donald Trump, without even citing the statute—8 U.S.C. section 1182(f)—that expressly authorizes the action they just stopped, has focused

By | 2017-03-20T15:34:45+00:00 March 20th, 2017|