It’s Not Us, It’s You: How Elites Rationalize This Year’s Voter Rebellion

By | 2017-06-02T18:30:05+00:00 August 31, 2016|
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conservative elites still don't understand trump voters

 

It’s not us, it’s you. That’s the line being floated by Conservatism, Inc. to explain this year’s voter rebellion. And it’s not just voters that have run afoul of the conservative crossing guards, it’s their enablers on talk radio and at Fox News. Got that? This year it’s not the liberal media that’s to blame—it’s the conservative media. You might want to buy a program because the enemies list changes quickly.

 

Conor Friedersdorf at the The Atlantic, quoting the editor of RedState, claims it’s Rush Limbaugh’s fault. National Review says it’s Fox News. But leave it to Bret Stephens in the Wall Street Journal to defend the punditocracy from the slings and arrows of the popular uprising against party leaders and the destructive policies they have pursued. Stephens claims that Trump voters (at least 80 percent of the Republican Party by most polls) see themselves as “America’s latest victim class” while casually equating Donald Trump with Vladimir Putin and Turkey’s equally ruthless strongman Recep Erdogan.

Apparently, if you object to the alienation of voters, to the stretching to the breaking point of the link between the sovereign citizen and the government—between rulers and ruled—then you are self-pitying milksop, a loser in the meritocratic war for money and status who has brought this upon himself.

Calling a supermajority of Republican voters the nation’s newest victim class is pretty rich coming from Bret Stephens who is on the record wishing that Donald Trump would “be so decisvely rebuked that the Republican Party and Republican voters will forever learn their lesson…” Voters have already learned some hard lessons—that’s why they rejected every conventional candidate and nominated Donald Trump with 5 million more votes than any other Republican nominee in history on a platform of border control, common sense trade deals that put the interests of American citizens ahead of Wall Street, and an American nationalism that believes this country is at its best when citizens are served by government not the other way around.

Still, these critiques of Trump voters, which are arrogant when they’re not merely condescending, offer a good insight into the disconnect between voters and elites. These are not people looking for pity or scapegoats onto which to load their sins. But confused by Trump’s rapid rise and enduring appeal, that’s how pundits, pols, and the consultant community have chosen to understand it. To their minds Trump can only be understood as a base appeal to self-pity and “identity politics”—the term conservative writers use when they want to call Republican voters racists without actually saying it.

But it’s simpler than that, in fact, this is Occam’s Razor at it’s simplest. Trump voters are ordinary Americans, motivated by a core set of beliefs about the country that used to be a given, especially on the Right. It isn’t Republican voters who have changed, it is Republican leaders.

And globalism isn’t a bogeyman, it’s an identifiable set of policies and attitudes relentlessly pursued by the intellectual and political leadership of both parties for the past 25 years. It’s hallmarks are elite rule through the administrative state, open borders that enrich big business at the expense of small even as they impoverish the working class, and an execrable crony capitalism marketed to the public as free trade.

Cui bono? the Romans asked. Who benefits? Look at the numbers and you will find out that it isn’t the vast majority of the American people. It’s a small slice at the top who are uniquely situated through wealth, birth, or personal achievement to reap the rewards of the new globalist system. And they like it—a lot. Who wouldn’t? But it’s these same people who increasingly see themselves as separate and apart from the rest of the country. They have become cosmopolitans more at home in a London salon than at a barbeque in Baton Rouge.

But this isn’t how it was sold to the American people. A rising tide, we were assured, would lift all boats. Free trade and immigration would grow the economy and make all Americans better off. But it didn’t. And now we’re told we can’t enforce our borders because “that’s not who we are.” What started as a policy to benefit the American people somehow became a moral crusade when those people complained that they were getting a raw deal.

Just look at a few key statistics: Before the globalist agenda was implemented the Labor Force Participation Rate hovered between 66 and 67 percent. It has declined steadily since 2000 to its current 62.7%. Likewise, median household income in inflation adjusted dollars peaked in 1999 at $57,483 and has fallen to $53,657 in the latest data compiled by the U.S. Census.

All the boats didn’t rise. The benefits of globalism have been concentrated at the very top and the very bottom. The wealthy, powerful, and connected have grown wealthier, more powerful and, in the Davos era, more connected to one another personally and professionally than ever before. The international brotherhood of man that was supposed to be ushered in by enlightened policy has turned out to be skiing in Gstaad in the winter and yachts on the Riviera in the summer—for everyone who can afford it. And at the bottom, government benefits have grown steadily richer even as the working and middle class have lost ground.

When Wall Street created the pyramid scheme masquerading as the mortgage industry (and the still growing time bomb in financial derivatives) who paid the price? Who went to jail? How many banks failed? How many bonuses paid on the fraudulent profits from the 2002-2007 era were clawed back. When the bill came due it wasn’t Wall Street that paid, it was Main Street. Everybody kept their bonuses and government bailed out the very firms that had engineered the collapse of the global economy. But they weren’t just bailed out, they were rewarded. The banks were forcibly consolidated making the oligopoly smaller, their market position more dominant, and their profits bigger. How’s that for moral hazard?

And the Davoisie still can’t figure out why voters are revolting. So their plan is to install Hillary in the White House so that “Republican voters will forever learn their lesson.” Trying to blame ordinary Americans for the destructive consequences of bad policies put in place by elites in service of their utopian dreams is a losing proposition. Chiding them when, after bearing the brunt of those consequences, they seek political change demonstrates a lack of wisdom borne of a uniquely privileged and insular existence.  

Concluding his indictment Bret Stephens laments what he sees as the lack of responsibility of his countrymen, writing, “It used to be that Americans looked askance at people who pointed fingers at everyone but themselves.” On this we agree. But when? When were these halcyon days?

Back when American nationalism (love of this country and its citizens) wasn’t considered an embarrassment? Back when we enforced our borders? Before the administrative state had usurped the sovereignty of the people and government believed it had a duty to serve only the interests of American citizens? It’s true. There used to be a lot of people that believed all of those things and took responsibility for themselves. It turns out that there still are. They just don’t get hired to write columns for the Wall Street Journal.

 

 

About the Author:

Chris Buskirk
Chris is the Publisher and Editor of American Greatness and the host of The Seth & Chris Show. He was a Publius Fellow at the Claremont Institute. and received a Fellowship from the Earhart Foundation. Chris is a serial entrepreneur who has built and sold businesses in financial services and digital marketing. He is a frequent guest on NPR's Morning Edition. His writing has appeared in The Washington Post, The Hill, and elsewhere. Connect with Chris on Twitter at @TheChrisBuskirk
  • Michael Woolley

    When you say globalism isn’t a bogeyman, you made a good point. But instead of bogeyman, I think you should use the actual original term “buggerman”. Buggery, the british term for sodomy. or unnatural sex. Kids used to be warned not to go out at night lest the “buggerman” get them. The globalists have indeed sneaked up in the night and have gang-buggered the American nation. So yes, globalists are indeed the “buggerman”.

  • eaglestalon

    Amen, Chris.

  • Beauceron

    First time, here, first article from this site I’ve read.
    Well done indeed.

    • BurkeanMama

      ME as well, I will be coming back,often.

      • ricocat1

        This does seem to be a good site.

    • MoreFreedom2

      It’s also my first time here. And while I agree with much of this, I disagree with several points. Buskirk is absolutely right that “It isn’t Republican voters who have changed, it is Republican leaders.” Most of the GOP politicians have become crony crapitalist liars, who claim to support free markets and limited government to get elected, then vote the exact opposite to facilitate their crony crapitalism deals for their personal benefit.

      I disagree with Buskirk that Wall Street was responsible for the 2008 mortgage crisis (it was clearly government’s fault – see the movie “The Big Short” for more detail). Wall Street (or the rich) can ask government for favors, but government can and should say no, but they choose to take the campaign cash instead, and want it to keep coming so must continue to sell us out.

      Secondly, while Buskirk shows that the benefits of globalism are concentrated at the top (the politicians and 1% folks) he doesn’t explain it’s a result of government favors to the top. Such as the government doing businesses favors via legislation, regulation, litigation and the permit process, rather than defending free markets and common law to resolve disputes in the courts. The other unmentioned factor here, is the fact that increasing government taxation and spending is what has contributed to wages not rising for 40 years: in other words, rather than allowing citizens to benefit from free trade, the government increased taxes to capture the benefits, leaving little to consumers. Do you know that when the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act was passed, that the US GDP fell by almost half within 3 short years before it was repealed? That’s how bad trade wars are. And it seems to me, Trump and a lot of Trump supporters are all for high tariffs – not good. We pay US tariffs, not foreign exporters.

      Finally, for an “American Greatness” website, I’d assume they’d be telling us what made American Great. What made us the prosperous envy of the world, is our freedoms (much of which we’ve lost – which is why incomes have been flat). It’s that simple.

      • CincinnatiRIck

        “Most of the GOP politicians have become crony crapitalist liars…” Sorry, but they have always been crony capitalist liars. What has happened is that Democrats have now overtaken them in that capacity. There are now more limousine liberals than there are compassionate conservatives and Wall Street is bankrolling the Democratic Party and, increasingly, the American peasantry has turned to the Republicans.

      • indi2

        Why are you blaming the government? The government is run by the ruling political elites–the exact same people the author criticizes. They are the government and government is them. Together they run the country and fail the people.

        • Scout Wellsrain

          Because he is a minarchist “libertarian” and hasn’t figured it out yet.

      • guerito777

        I wanted to say the same thing. You got to it first, and I believe more eloquently than I could have

    • railroad_gin

      As a bonus: Unlike some other sites who shall remain nameless, this one has refrained from allowing Mark Zuckerberg to stand athwart conservatism and yell stop. Very promising from the looks of it.

      • CincinnatiRIck

        Agreed…I hate those sites where you have to be a Facebooker in order to comment.

    • BamaGirl

      Me too. First-timer, and found so refreshing to hear some truth & sound reasoning for once … so SO many lies! You start to feel like you’re going INSANE!

      Bookmarked the site & looking forward to more goodness.

      Thanks again for the gem!

  • bookish1

    Elitists just don’t get it.
    Their unrelenting condescension toward Trump supporters and their refusal to acknowledge his ability to put American safety above political correctness reveals their ignorance.
    They OWN Hillary’s SC picks.

    • anb1

      Awww…..poor little victim.

      Everyone with a triple digit IQ knows that any normal Republican candidate would be beating Hillary at this juncture. Seems to me the people that own Hillary’s SC picks are the whiny Trumpkins.

      Does my condescension towards you make me an elitist? Cool.

      • June Maulfair

        Bull! No matter who was the Republican nominee, the press would be highlighting every perceived error, questioning every policy and making fun of them in some way. If another article I read is correct and polls are being skewed in favor of democrats, Trump may already be in the lead. As it is, they are tied.

        • anb1

          Amazing as it might be to you and your fellows, I wish that were true. But I have seen nothing that leads me to believe that Trump has anything more than a slim chance in the electoral college. Earlier in the process I thought even swing states like Pennsylvania could be in play–it’s looking pretty grim right now.

          • Sophia F

            As of today, Nate Silver has it close to a 50/50 chance.

      • charliehorse

        Revel in your precieved condescension. Considering that 51% of Congress are millionaires while 4% of the general public have attained that exalted financial strata. Condescension is an epidemic too many suffer with.

        With Hillary leaving the White House, “broke and in debt”, with a nice pile of White House property they were required to return, and with only hard work and a few speeches now are worth 200 Million. Ask yourself, what did they sell?

        Rich and Condescending Hillary will appoint the next 2 or 3 Supreme Court Justices if she gets her wish and returns to the White House with William Jefferson in tow. You can kiss your 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, and 10th Amendments goodbye.

        Voting your principles will result in your children asking you how America became a Socialist/Police State. Prepare your answer now as you may become ill and Obama Care may not treat you well.

        If you leave Government Service after a lifetime of effort and are rich…you’re a crook.

        • Cato

          If your biggest issue truly is the Supreme Court, you probably should have spent a little time doing research and putting up a candidate who was electable.

          What’s actually going on here is that you think this argument is going to sway people on the fence.

          Good luck, and remember that we told you so.

          • charliehorse

            Well Cato, I did pick several of the 16 that turned out for the selection of the Republican Party. Mr Trump disposed off all of mine, and all the rest. He garnered 5 million more votes than any Republican in a primary to date.

            I believe that Hillary is spoiled goods and there is no way she’ll be elected President. Remember, you heard it here.

          • CincinnatiRIck

            Unfortunately, Charlie, your man Trump is also the epitome of “spoiled goods.” I don’t say that there won’t be an “October surprise” that discredits the Obama/Clinton national security approach but, if Trump is elected, he will have no mandate.

          • charliehorse

            Neither of them will graduate to the White House with a mandate Rick.

            Some spoiled goods are vastly more rotten that other garbage, but in Hillary’s case, she has three Federal Investigations monitoring her odor.

          • Cato

            Perhaps. In my part of the Republican world, Trump is losing suburban women in greater numbers than I’ve ever seen. Better hope the missing voters show up.

            Maybe I’m wrong, and I certainly won’t be voting for Clinton myself, but Trump created a rift larger than the Grand Canyon through the party. He may have received more votes, but he also received the smallest portion. And took the longest to seal it up if anyone in recent Republican history.

            It’s possible this is 1980 for the Republicans, but it’s far more likely this year will be more like 1964. I just don’t see evidence that the party is lining up, and I have a job with the party in a swing state.

            Short of new developments like Trump showing up to the debates with a newfound encyclopedic knowledge and presidential bearing, this is over.

          • indi2

            I think you meant “.. don’t see evidence that the party elites are lining up..” They did not line up either in the primary and in fact did everything they could to undermine him, and failed. The forgotten voters will come out to vote “against” the party elites of the right and the left. Well, I sure hope I got that right. As far as debate, Hillary is going to use the numbers? Hillary may be a “seasoned” debater, but she is not a good one at all. She is wooden. People don’t believe her and she is boring (It matters in the debate.) Knowledge? She does not even know what is considered confidential material and how to handle them. Her incompetence is beyond belief. In short, she is so fill of holes that Trump can exploit.

          • Cato

            No, I mean my work with the party suggests there are even fewer early voters we’ve got logged and we are experiencing a lot of pushback from suburban women.

            He already has the authenticity vote, he needs to persuade people (moderate lean-republicans) who think he’s going to blow them up that his thinking is less erratic than his speaking.

            This is a serious concern that has the potential to lead to a Democrat wave.

          • indi2

            I understand your anxiety. But don’t worry too much, the on-the-fence GOP voters are coming back to Trump in recent weeks, seeing him getting more serious. News today says that he has 90% of GOP voters behind him, comparing to 92% DEM voters for Hillary. So that is not bad. What Trump needs to make up are the minority voters and young women. Somehow the GOP managed to alienate almost ALL minorities and I do not think Trump can do much about it. But if he can bring in new and “forgotten” voters, especially those lower middle class voters whom seldom vote before, he is going to win. The biggest loser in this election is the GOP elites who defect and support Hillary. They won’t be welcome when either candidate are elected. They represent the old GOP that is doomed.

          • charliehorse

            There may be little to bolster your resolve, but it must not be Clinton. I will gladly take Trump, the unknown quality over Hillary in a heart beat. We know what she is and what she represents. Other than that, what is there to debate?

            Steel yourself with the image of Hillary Clinton repeating the oath of office with Supreme Court Chief Justice Roberts before you go to sleep, if you can after that image burns a hole in your cerebral cortex, and get your second wind. Cato…never give up…never! This is literally the hill to die on.

          • Cato

            It’s not me to convince. It’s people who pay less attention. Trump needs to transition, and fast. He needs to learn the facts and work on presentation.

            Plenty of people are just now tuning in, and if he can cast doubt on the media reports of the last year with a solid performance, they may give him a fighting shot.

            But if he’s the rambling mess he has been, he is done. It just could have been so much easier, and to the point of this article: yeah, I do think his primary victory was driven as much by ignorance and anger as reflective desire to change the alternatives placed before America

          • CincinnatiRIck

            ” I do think his primary victory was driven as much by ignorance and anger as reflective desire to change the alternatives placed before America.”
            Anger, yes. Ignorance, no more so than in any other political campaign. Or, are you trying to imply that Trump voters are, by definition, ignorant? Sanders voters were also angry. Were they also ignorant?
            Arguably, it is those voters who continue to vote as they have in the past and yet somehow expect some different result, that are the truly ignorant. If you are a part of the America that has been left behind while the two coastal enclaves and Capital City prosper, there is something wrong with you if you don’t use the franchise to try to do something about it.

          • Cato

            Anger is acceptable. I am angry with the way things have been run. But anger is not an excuse for wishful thinking.

            Bernie supporters were ignorant by the very fact that their preferred policies were impossible. College cannot be free without middle class tax raises. Healthcare can not be free without middle class tax increases. Social Security cannot be expanded while reducing middle class contributions.

            Trump voters also preferred policies that were unable to bring about their desires. Building a wall will not prevent immigrants from making it here. It treats the symptom of immigration without acknowledging the cause: Mexican poverty and higher American wages.

            Nor will tariffs or “common sense trade deals” bring back jobs that have been automated. That’s wishful thinking.

            So yes, people who buy into those policies do strike me as ignorant.

            A way to change things is to educate yourself and vote in primaries. People bitch about their choices when they won’t lift a finger to change them; in that sense you are right. But engaging in delusions is not the path forward.

          • CincinnatiRIck

            “So yes, people who buy into those policies do strike me as ignorant.”
            And they would tell you that you are lacking in imagination and failing to think outside the box. There are costs to their policy choices that you find unthinkable. I also find them unthinkable for me but I acknowledge that they may be reasonable for others who are differently situated.

          • Cato

            It’s one thing to insist on thinking outside the box. It’s an entirely different one to insist that once you make that leap, gravity will no longer work, simply because you want it to.

            Sanders’ plans are impossible. They are fiscally impossible.

            Trump’s are too, insofar as they assume the ability to turn back the clock. Manufacturing jobs aren’t just gone; they don’t exist anymore. There is not now, nor will there ever be, the will to decrease everybody’s welfare to save a shrinking category of employment.

          • CincinnatiRIck

            Bad analogy: Gravity is yesterday’s primitive and highly localized physics. We’ve long since moved on to quantum mechanics.

          • Cato

            Jury’s out: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_gravity

            But since you chose not to address the seeming impossibilities of these two politicians’ policies, I’ll assume that the problem is not MY imagination.

          • CincinnatiRIck

            Did you fail to grasp the import of ” I also find them unthinkable for me but I acknowledge that they may be reasonable for others who are differently situated.”?

            I try to avoid the conceit that my inability to imagine forecloses the possibility that others can. May I recommend such modesty to you.

          • Cato

            Some things just don’t work, no matter how much you think they will.

            And just when I thought I’d seen it all, here’s a a trump supporter who is also a relativist.

          • CincinnatiRIck

            Wrong on both counts. Not a Trump supporter. And also not a relativist. It’s called “relationism”…Karl Mannheim’s Sociology of Knowledge. The poor man’s version is the parable of the Blind Men and the Elephant.

          • Cato

            Then let me respond this way: they are probably not willfully ignorant. Yes, people’s knowledge is shaped in part by extrinsic factors. But people, once congnizant of the influences around them, may begin to come to see how those factors have influenced their thought.

            Even if it is not their fault, strictly speaking, that does not mean that their views should be considered equally valid. For example, if readily available facts are made known to them, and they are unable to explain how those facts actually match their theory or cannot provide facts that can counter mine, perhaps their ideas should be given less weight.

            Without this exercise of judgment, relationism risks sliding into simple relativism. Even Mannheim recognized this and sought to avoid it.

          • CincinnatiRIck

            No, in fact he was guilty of the very conceit that I counseled you to avoid. He posited that the free-floating and economically unmoored (class free, in Marxist terms) intelligentsia would be capable of subsuming all the partial views of reality in a holistic one. In other words, he exempted HIS class from the limitations, constraints and biases of mere mortals.
            Like the rest of us, he did his best work when he was young. Should have quit while he was ahead.

          • vaccinia

            You are not a scientist, are you?

          • CincinnatiRIck

            Good morning. While I abhor the hubris underlying it, my discipline is commonly characterized as a “social science.” I would say, “no.”

          • vaccinia

            Well…..it’s just that Gravity is NOT yesterdays primitive and highly localized physics. The theory of general relativity is the most successful physical theory ever devised AND there is no theory of quantum gravity that is of any value whatsoever. Sorry to get on my high horse but that one was a whopper…..

          • So It Goes

            Wishful thinking is that Mexican poverty is the proper concern of Americans. US responsibility extends to the border.

          • Maggie Gray

            Global trade is good, Globalism is not because it’s way too political. When governments first got involved, the cronyism began. With Globalism we’re dealing not with just trade but Climate Change and normalization of our laws with the rest of the world. Separate unelected tribunals to manage disputes and open borders over which we have no control? Is that what you really want?

            When it’s not enough to redistribute wealth, redistribute the people instead. Yeah, that’ll do us just fine and dandy.

            Your utopian ideas of trade are one thing, allowing Globalism to take over is quite another. Utopia meets real world. All Trump wants to do is bring us back to Country vs Country as Britain does too. Cronyism will still exist because…governments, but it won’t suck the sovereignty from us.

            In a leaked portion of the TPP draft, it was revealed that penalties against China for various ‘cheats’ and currency manipulation will be dismissed in exchange for IP protections for….Hollywood.

            Tax code changes will help a bit. Many large manufacturers may not come back but new ones will begin right here and last for a while anyway. It’s just time to pull back a bit and it’s not like all trade will end.

            I love CATO and think Friedman is a god but there are times when we have to stop and take stock of what we are doing and make some adjustments.

            Unless, of course, you favor Globalism where all countries are equal, have a polity that looks like every other country, have open borders and expect the world to be a safer and happier place. IOW, make the globe one gigantic EU. That’s the direction we’re heading in. If you want that then ADMIT it.

          • N0 0ne

            “It treats the symptom of immigration without acknowledging the cause: Mexican poverty and higher American wages.”

            So to control our borders, we have to bring the entire world up to US standards of living? Or (more likely as a neocon/ neolib goal) bring the US down to their standards of living? Typical mindless globalist cant. How many African illegal immigrants make it across the Sinai border to Israel since they built the wall? Isn’t that a considerably larger income differential?

            If you were arguing in good faith (you’re not), I’d say that you’re letting the perfect be the enemy of the good enough, but as it is, your “argument” reads more like pure sophistry.

          • MomInlatteland

            The suburban women I know didn’t vote for Romney or McCain… they were leftys already. I argued vehemently with them in 2004 expressing my (justified) concerns which fell on deaf ears. By 2008 I didn’t even bother. They think Obama is wonderful and are already lost to Hillary. I do, however, know people who voted for Obama and now support Trump. However, as you might conclude from my Disqus name, I live in the heart of leftyville on the Northleft Coast.

          • Cato

            Interesting. Yes, depending on the environ, suburban women do have different patterns of voting historically. My concern is specifically (and anecdotally) that there are numbers of women I know who fit this description who normally vote Republican without hesitation, but will this time go for Clinton.

            That is not to say the outflow can’t be matched by new inflows. I just fear that it isn’t materializing.

          • PhysicistVet

            “Trump created a rift larger than the Grand Canyon through the party. He
            may have received more votes, but he also received the smallest portion.”

            Just for the record, I’m not a Republican (or Democrat), and I don’t support Trump (or Clinton). Now that the disclaimers are out of the way, some numbers:

            Republicans are around 1/4 of the electorate AND FALLING. Democrats are barely above 1/4 AND FALLING.

            Assuming like a rift in the GOP is the end of his candidacy, and that Trump being publicly blasted by a political party with near historical low approval ratings (or a Congress with HISTORICALLY low approval ratings) is a but naive (and that’s me being polite about it).

            If you want your party to survive, I’d suggest trying to figure out why your party is DYING, not trying to kill anyone who doesn’t fall in line or anyone who brings in a record breaking number of votes. I’ll give you a hint: it’s largely about the fact that the average Americans are sick of a MINORITY PARTY that “represents” a small fraction of the population DOESN’T BOTHER even trying to represent the voters who elect them and instead only does what a wealthy handful demand and scr*ws over their base the SECOND the ballots are done being cast.

            I tried making similar recommendations plenty in the Democratic Party and pointed to Sanders and the whole host of numerical data supporting my arguments to no avail. Don’t get me wrong, I’m fairly anti-party, as I see them as more or less a vehicle and cover for corruption, collusion, nepotism, and covering up some of the most horrifying cases of fraud and electioneering, but whichever party figures out that the majority voters are sick of the elitist we know what’s best for you attitude and start ACTUALLY doing what THE MAJORITY of voters REPEATEDLY show they WANT AND DEMAND on issue after issue (the data’s available for all to see, and people in both parties agree on a TON of things both parties’ politicians unite to deny) will be the next one to win a presidential election in a unanimous/near unanimous electoral college victory.

            But that’s not coming for a while (my guess). Still way too much cash to be made before the public forces it or they allow it. Still too many ways for them to distract us and to chop us into warring camps and get us to start screaming in each others faces as “enemies” whenever we start teaming up to demand more from our government.

          • charliehorse

            Pardon me for butting in here Doc, but there isn’t time to reinvent the wheel. There is only time enough to insure a Progressive/Socialist Alinisky disciple doesn’t get into the White House and the conservatives gain enough time to steer this vessel away from the reef.

          • PhysicistVet

            “There is only time enough to insure a Progressive/Socialist Alinisky
            disciple doesn’t get into the White House and the conservatives gain
            enough time to steer this vessel away from the reef.”

            HAHAHA!!!

            Yes, keep on pretending that Clinton is a progressive and not just another crony corporate clone practically identical to Bush and company, and who was bestest buds with folks like Trump and his ilk barely a decade ago.

            It’s those “evil socialists” you must stop at all costs, so vote for (fill in the blank) or else we are all doomed! Doomed I say!

            Or was it the evil commies I was supposed to be terrified of so that I vote for one candidate or the other? Hard to say, since Clinton’s trying to bring back the evil Rooskies as the bogeyman hiding under my bed as a campaign tactic. Or maybe the scary “fascist” monsters hiding in the shadows to steal our babies and eat them alive?

          • charliehorse

            That is exactly what I meant to say Doc. You can po-po all you like, this nation can’t stand another Clinton in office and she should be impeached today with Articles of Impeachment brought by a simple majority vote in the House.

            Go ahead and giggle about the Rooskies under your bed, but by the time Hilary left office in 8 years the Administrative State would be in full swing and living in the shadow of that gray Federal building doesn’t appeal to me. 25 million Illegals granted amnesty and with the boarders still wide open, this nation will never recover. There is your “bogeyman” smart guy…learn Spanish.

            If you have no problem with HRH Clinton violating the Espionage Act, the Federal Records Act and the US Code 793, you are part of the problem.

            Her transgressions are more serious than Nixon’s and that is clear to me no matter how much smoke the Obama and Clinton teams want to blow.

          • PhysicistVet

            “You can po-po all you like, this nation can’t stand another Clinton in office”

            Seriously? Try re-reading this thread, silly. I DO NOT support Clinton, silly.

            I was pointing out that your RIDICULOUS notion that she’s some sort of socialist is absurd. She’s every bit as much a corporate crony hack as every other corporate crony DC hack who PRETENDS to be on opposite sides in public but GOES TO ALL THE SAME FUNDRAISERS and collects huge stacks of cash from ALL THE SAME CORPORATIONS.

            “If you have no problem with HRH Clinton violating the Espionage Act, the Federal Records Act and the US Code 793”

            I ABSOLUTELY DO have issues with it.

            But do continue to ASSUME AWAY about how I’m the “bad guy” because I’m not parroting out the EXACT SAME WORDS you used to paint the “other team” as the “bad guys” with the specific (incorrect) label that you DEMAND THAT I USE. Just because I don;t copy/paste your comment does not mean I am disagreeing with EVERYTHING YOU EVER HAVE BELIEVED and that I believe the EXACT OPPOSITE of EVERYTHING and that I am 100% AGAINST everything you are 100% FOR.

            You intentionally blind and deaf partisan extremists on the right are EVERY BIT s bad as the “tolerant” extremists on the far left who are EXACTLY LIKE YOU, thinking that the only way for the country to be better is if their TINY MINORITY of fringe voters got to have ABSOLUTE AUTHORITY and EVERYONE else was eliminated from the nation and/or FORCED to be silent and comply.

            GTFO. And GFY.

          • charliehorse

            “I was pointing out that your RIDICULOUS notion that she is some kind of socialist is absurd”.

            Thanks for pointing out how ridiculous you see my post. Hillary’s Masters was about Saul Alinsty, and her attempt at social medicine during Bill Presidency seems socialist to me…but then, who knew?

            Maybe clarity isn’t your strong suit when mixed in with the snark and sarc. As far as your assessment on blind and deaf partisan extremists goes, you miss who is intolerant here Doc, and it looks like you take first prize.

            Take your position of judge on which side is the minority is on and your evaluations of posts that seem to think anyone cares what you think. I’m not seeing any “up” votes to your rants.

            Here is a quote from your post, “GTFO. And GFY” with vigor I’ll add.

          • PhysicistVet

            ” her attempt at social medicine during Bill Presidency seems socialist to me…but then, who knew?”

            Seems like you bought the silliness hook line and sinker, ESPECIALLY since you are FULLY AWARE that she is plenty ok with Alinsky.

            If they WANTED that garbage, do you think they’d have put Hillary in charge, the ONE person who DEFINITELY could NOT have gotten anywhere and would have caused FAR MORE opposition than was present even before Bill was elected? It was intentional and gave the Clintons all the “street cred” they EVER needed with the liberal and progressive crowd. There were DOZENS of blue dog Dems and moderate Dems they could have put in the forefront who had a TON of respect with the large moderate GOP faction at the time who could have likely made progress IF THEY ACTUALLY WANTED IT.
            Even now, the Clintons deflect so much criticism of their corporate sell out ways by pointing to their doomed from the start healthcare games from the early 90s as if that “proves” how liberal and “on the people’s side” they are.

            “I’m not seeing any “up” votes to your rants.”

            Yes, because that’s how truth and accuracy are determined, right? By popularity? 1984 is here, and you EMBRACE it.

          • Maggie Gray

            Trump is electable. You are the ones that are holding him back and he may very well overcome you stubborn fools.

            And, remember, if he loses we know who to blame.

        • James

          Interesting you should say that. If you’re going to accuse the Clintons, you might want to check who else is a crook.

          http://www.celebritynetworth.com/richest-politicians/republicans/rudy-giuliani-net-worth/

          Hillary Clinton’s speaking fee is not unusual for a former first lady, Senator, and Secretary of State. It is, notably, less than Donald Trump’s.

          http://www.celebritynetworth.com/articles/how-much-does/talk-is-not-cheap-former-politicians-are-charging-outrageous-speaking-fees/

          • charliehorse

            I’ll wager that the content of Mr Trumps speeches are available and easily obtained. What he was selling is apparent.

            Hillary Clinton holds onto her speeches and will not let anyone see what is in them. As far as who is the crook, I’ll pose the question once again for you. What were the Clintons selling? Drop back with the answer at your lesure.

          • CincinnatiRIck

            “As for as who is the crook, I’ll pose the question once again for you. What were the Clintons selling?”
            Ouch!

          • charliehorse

            Yup….no kidding ouch.

        • J. Plante

          Charliehorse…I’m an Independent conservative who won’t vote HRC, but I’m waiting for Trump to convince me that he’s the right choice.
          I question a few of your assertions…how did HRC leave the White House broke? What does that mean?
          How will HRC appoint the next 2 or 3 Justices? I don’t understand that one either. And even if she did, how would that equate to us losing all of those rights?
          Also, are you saying that Americans should put party allegiance over principles when voting? If so, what about the fact that many GOPers are Conservatives, but that the nominee doesn’t espouse any conservative values?
          How do we square all of that?
          Just trying to understand what you’re asking of us.

          • charliehorse

            If you are truly an Independent Conservative and not just pulling my leg, what other choice do you have than Trump. By this time all the fooling around is over, and a vote for Johnson is a fart in the wind as it’ll have no positive effect other than one less vote for Trump against Clinton.

            As to Hillary saying she was broke, she can be seen saying exactly that statement, google it, not hard to find. She was asserting that they had spent all their money fighting the charges against William Jefferson in both his impeachment proceedings and the suits brought for his sexual crimes. All that horrible “Right Wing Conspiracy” they trot out as the big dragon they have to combat all their lives. Cash payouts went to several women who sued him. Now just 15 years later they have 200 million in the bank, several mansions and on and on……nice work if you can get it, I’d say.

            If Hillary Clinton is elected President she will fill the now existing Supreme Court vacancy and time will bring another one or two for her to appoint. If Sotomayor and Kagan are the examples of Liberal Justices she will duplicate or if she goes for the Ginsburg model, a judge for the ACLU appointed by Bill Clinton in 1993, they all would give the Supreme Court a decided left lean for the next generation. Gun control, free speech….all subject to reevaluation along with the entire collection of the Amendments to the Bill of Rights.

            The evaluation of weather to follow your principles or party affiliation is the same for members of both parties. Do what you feel is best for this Republic…your children and grandchildren. Th future of this nation hinges on this election like none in my lifetime and I’m well past 65.

          • J. Plante

            Hi Charlie…I’m not pulling you leg and I admit that I don’t have the answer to what other choice we have…because we don’t. The only option that I and other committed conservatives see is to leave the ballot blank and to concentrate on the down-ballot races. I’ll admit…not much of a choice and that strategy could actually help HRC.
            Thanks for the explanation on “leaving the White House broke.” I had misunderstood your point. However, I understand that Bill makes quite a bit on the speaking circuit, so their newfound riches isn’t a surprise. I don’t condone it, but I don’t fault them as all of these high powered politicians of both stripes get rich doing speaking engagements or serving on corporate boards. As you say, nice work if you can get it!
            Thanks for writing back…good luck to all of us in this election.

          • charliehorse

            One final comment J. is the HUGE fees Bill Clinton was able to demand were much too often (most of the time) from nation states, corporations and individuals who were seeking access to the Sec of State and the channels of power unique to the power of government. She was selling what only that office could provide…US influence and goods. Getting $500,000.00 for a 45 minute speech in some obscure ex-satellite of Russia or in a dictator’s phony government congress-hall in Africa.

      • Francois

        No, It just makes you a DICK

        • anb1

          I see that you and similar losers have been quite busy while I’ve been living my life. Pathetic gang of trolls.

          • CincinnatiRIck

            The evidence in this discussion thread documents that, so far from “living my life”, you’ve been quite busy trolling yourself.

          • anb1

            Huh? English, please.

          • CincinnatiRIck

            Your intellectual poverty is not my problem. But I will give you a clue: one who claims to be living his life while others are busy trolling is subject to having their hypocrisy revealed by the heavy trail of their own commentary; i.e. “the pot calling the kettle black.”

        • anb1

          Oh, I forgot to mention: you French piece of trash.

      • Turbo

        Generally, anyone who uses the banal “everyone knows” canard is indeed an elitist, but one whose IQ’s putative emergence into triple digit territory remains in question.

        • vaccinia

          Not elitist….merely uninformed. After all, “It isn’t so much that liberals are ignorant. It’s just that they know so many things that aren’t so.”

      • gmonsen

        Ah, I read a later comment from you and hadn’t noted that you are some sort of babbling troll. Trust me, you would at best be a wannabe elitist…

        • anb1

          Hilarious little internet tough guy. Just using your own bitter little words, dope.

          • KaNsas

            Project much, lefty?

      • Shore111

        No – just boring.

      • nolawyers1

        A little harsh but yeah, Kasich would be beating Hillary well at this point. I think that the Trump followers just got caught up by the anger train and now are unable to jump off because to them, it’s him or Hillary.
        And so I vote for Weld and Johnson.

        • Kasich would now be the worst person in the world according to the press! He would be a racist,sexist homophobic villian, just like Mitt was(they sure miss Mitt now though). Also Kasich could be depended upon by the Dems to stay in his lane and follow the script.

        • anb1

          I would be prepared to vote for the libertarian ticket, but…..not a fan of Johnson. Running out of choices, but I live in Washington state, so I don’t think my vote is too important.

          • vaccinia

            You can thus afford a vanity vote….write in your favorite candidate.

        • Lawrence Duffield

          Or, too many faux conservatives got caught up by the anger train and refused to support the GOP candidate chosen by the largest number of primary GOP voters in history.

          Mr. Trump wasn’t my pick. But, as in every other election, the next task is to decide whether President Trump or President Clinton would be better for the country (or do less harm, if you are a pessimist). There is really no doubt that the person who will do MORE harm is corrupt, FBI certified serial liar Hillary; literally capable of throwing her subordinates to the wolves without protection; literally capable of selling access to the U. S. Secretary of State or easing the sale of 20% of the U.S. uranium supply for Clinton Foundation cash; literally promising to dramatically increase taxes on nearly everyone while preserving the “Affordable Care Act” which is costing middle America thousands more for health insurance while providing less choice and larger deductibles.

          You’re trying to blame your GOP opponents for a coming loss you’re doing nothing to prevent. By definition, you would be partly responsible for that loss. However, Mr. Trump may well win, in which case you are definitely NOT responsible in any way for that win – where does that leave you in the Republican Party?

          Good luck with that “Weld & Johnson” vote. They won’t take a single State, and probably neither will their down-ticket candidates, if they even have any in your State. Its just a fig leaf to cover for letting the rest of us decide who will be President.

          • CincinnatiRIck

            You tell ’em, Larry. I’m no fan of Trump but, come 2020, I won’t be forgiving of those who didn’t do their best to prevent Hillary.

        • vaccinia

          And because of this you get hillary…..reality 101.

      • taek1

        YOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.

        • anb1

          Repeating posts? Repeating MY posts? One more time, punk….

          • taek1

            Since you asked for it, I’ll do it gladly. Just to please you, not just once, but 10 times over. If you want more just ask.

            taek1 anb1 • 3 hours ago

            YOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.

            taek1 anb1 • 3 hours ago

            YOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.

            taek1 anb1 • 3 hours ago

            YOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.

            taek1 anb1 • 3 hours ago

            YOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.

            taek1 anb1 • 3 hours ago

            YOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.

            taek1 anb1 • 3 hours ago

            YOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.

            taek1 anb1 • 3 hours ago

            YOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.

            taek1 anb1 • 3 hours ago

            taek1 anb1 • 3 hours ago

            YOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.

            YOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.

          • anb1

            Duly noted, flagged, and reported.

          • taek1

            Maybe so, but most crucially did you understand:

            taek1 anb1 • 3 hours agoYOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.taek1 anb1 • 3 hours agoYOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.taek1 anb1 • 3 hours agoYOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.taek1 anb1 • 3 hours agoYOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.taek1 anb1 • 3 hours agoSince you asked for it, I’ll do it gladly. Just to please you, not just once, but 10 times over. If you want more just ask.taek1 > anb1 • 20 hours ago

            taek1 anb1 • 3 hours agoYOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.taek1 anb1 • 3 hours agoYOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.taek1 anb1 • 3 hours agoYOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.taek1 anb1 • 3 hours agoYOUR FEAR IS PALPABLE.taek1 anb1 • 3 hours agoSince you asked for it, I’ll do it gladly. Just to please you, not just once, but 10 times over. If you want more just ask.taek1 > anb1 • 20 hours ago

      • helen souza

        Notice the liberal ‘go to device’, call you stupid with big words. In other words, ‘me smart, you stupid’ I say again, the elite mind is so clueless. Can’t even understand that his/her comment is proof of this writer’s premise. No to your question, you are obviously an elitist and will go to our grave being one because you people are like dinosaurs and hopefully will go by the wayside like they did.

        • anb1

          What?

      • Connor✓ᵀᴿᵁᴹᴾ

        My IQ’s 130 and I proudly support Trump

        • anb1

          Ha ha ha ha ha. I was just about to say….anyone who (a) knows his IQ and (b) boasts about it on a message board….is kind of sad. We agree! You are a clown.

          • Connor✓ᵀᴿᵁᴹᴾ

            You mentioned “anyone with a triple digit IQ”. I also didn’t “boast” about it, I made a factual statement, namely to discredit your belief that no intelligent person can support Trump.

            You were the one implying IQ actually meant something.

          • anb1

            Ha ha ha ha ha. Pathetic.

          • Connor

            Liberal deflection is pretty hilarious

      • El Crappo

        No, it makes you narrow minded and arrogant. By definition a Democrat lackey.

        • anb1

          Projection is a leftist characteristic–you are in no position to call anyone narrow minded, punk. Dealing with idiots might make me arrogant. But I believe in free markets. You do not. That makes you the leftist in this discussion, loser.

          • KaNsas

            You’re the punk, lefty. But you get back on that bong and keep humming. A reckoning is coming soon.

          • anb1

            Good one, weasel. Are you 6 years old? Back to mommy’s basement, little fella.

      • vaccinia

        Elitist? Why would anyone perceive you to be an elite?

        • anb1

          Trumpkins tend to label anyone who believes in conservative principles as such.

          • vaccinia

            Nahhh, they label people who think they know what is best for the nation, over the very people who make up that nation, as elitist. Usually, this would be ivory tower Progs, BUT the GOP machine is trying hard for second place….

          • anb1

            Elitists…..Machine….why don’t you throw in another stupid, meaningless word that you nuts like, such as “globalists”?

          • vaccinia

            We don’t like….. you. How’s that for a stupid, meaningless word.

      • Severn

        Everyone with a triple digit IQ knows that any normal Republican candidate would be beating Hillary at this juncture.

        Everybody who “knows” that is an imbecile.

        • anb1

          So saith this buffoon. Typical Trumpkin.

      • Bunky

        You wrote “Everyone with a triple digit IQ knows that any normal Republican
        candidate would be beating Hillary at this juncture.”
        Just what do you base your pronouncements on?
        Feelings?

        • anb1

          No, Bunkster. Hillary is the second most unlikeable and second least trustworthy candidate in history.

          • Bunky

            You believe that if any of the others won they would be declared more likeable?
            The MSM would filet them easily.
            The difference is they wouldn’t fight back … Trump does, hence he’s close.

      • indi2

        You have no proof on that. Any of those primary polling does not necessarily indicate a certain GOP win by those “other” candidates. They just could not general the kind of enthusiasm Trump brought. I looked at every one of them and they are ALL pretty boring, despite politically correct. Many GOP voters might just stay home instead.

        • anb1

          The whole idea that a president has to be a showman is indicative of the moral and mental decay of the country. I would have hoped Obama would have cured the country of this shallow obsession with celebrity. But it just gets worse and worse.

          • CincinnatiRIck

            Our form of government does not require a brilliant leader as President, chafing under the burden of accommodating to lesser mortals. In fact we are better served by someone who is under no illusion that he is “the smartest guy in the room.” Our Constitution is best facilitated by one who is temperamentally capable of the humility to respect the republican form of government and be mature enough to understand that those who oppose him are not “evil” people acting out of personal malice or prejudice.

            Unfortunately and increasingly, the qualities required to attain the office do not comport well with the Constitutional intent. And thus progression from the Obama regime we know to the Trump regime becomes plausible. One would think, from its place in history, the Rubicon to be a mighty river but it is a very unimpressive and middling stream when you get right down to it. And those cheering on the expansive use of executive, regulatory and judicial power today will not realize their grave error until someone as headstrong as Obama, but with a very different agenda, is seated on the throne and employing the very tools and precedents they think they love so much today.

          • indi2

            Showmanship is an effective tool and temperament a leader should have. It is NOT a moral and mental decay the way you see it. And which of the world leaders in not considered a “celebrity” by its people? “Popularity” ties very closely with the celebrity status and it is an asset of any effective leader, if used wisely.

      • Maggie Gray

        That’s what you told yourself months ago and you still refuse to accept reality so you withhold your vote and make sure your friends withhold theirs to manufacture a self-fulfilling prophecy.

        Your willful ignorance is apparent to all so don’t kid yourself because we know exactly who to blame if Trump should lose. Contra your condescension towards us, our contempt for you is awesome.

        • anb1

          Ooh, look at MagMag, speaking for “all”. No, dipsh!t, I will vote for Trump as the lesser of two evils, although it won’t matter. “Our” contempt…..does it make you feel cool to think you are part of a crowd? You’re not.

    • MNJAM

      Damned elitists!!!! They need to be taken down. Someone should publish a list.

    • Keyser Soze

      don’t think for one second that they don’t get it, because THEY do get it, now!!!!!!!!!!!

    • Cato

      You own those picks. Any other Republican would have beat her this year. Instead Trump decided to waste his convention bump by insulting a fallen soldier and his family. Talk about shooting yourself in the foot every time.

      • Severn

        You people are incapable of not lying. Trump did not “insult a fallen solder”.

        In other news, Trump did not ask the Russian government to hack US government severs. He did not say that he could shoot somebody on Fifth Ave and not lose support. He did not embrace the KKK. He did not flip-flop on immigration. Just about everything you think you know about Trump is a fiction.

        • Cato

          No, I watched the full interview where he refused to disavow David Duke.

          I watched him assume Rubio’s position on immigration after making fun of little Marco’s positions the whole primary season.

          It was meant as a joke, but he did say he could shoot someone and never lose voters.

          And he did decide to make fun of the officer’s family, choosing to say, as he put it so eloquently: “why wasn’t she talking? Wasn’t she allowed?”

          You seem to be phrasing this as a question to us: “But who are ya gonna believe, Trump or your lying eyes? ”

          The man isn’t evil, but he doesn’t have a clue how to conduct himself.

          • Bunky

            Rubio’s position was amnesty. It still is.
            Trump’s position is they have to go.
            That’s quite different.
            As far as the family of the slain captain goes, they were the ones that put themselves up front as DNC shills. They reaped the rewards.

          • Cato

            Rubio moved from the left toward the center. Trump moved from right to the center. He has backed off deportation for all except criminals, which come to think of it was where Rubio last spouted off. Neither is credible on the issue.

          • indi2

            But he did also said that all illegals are subject to deportation. He just said it won’t happen till other things of higher priorities are settled. So he did not back it off. He just postpone it. He is right that we need to first secure the border to stop the leak first, then deal with the illegals here. I think he has a grand plan to pump up the Mexico economy where jobs are created and lots of illegals will “self-deport” (return) on their own. And the problem will be largely solved. It is a win-win. The issue will longer be a pressing issue by then.

          • Cato

            Sorry to break it to ya, but short of Kasich, not a single of the final four candidates believed that illegals shouldn’t be subject to deportation. They simply reasonably concluded it couldn’t be done in one term, solely by the government, short of external factors.

            When other candidates pointed this out, Trump told them more or less that they were stupid. Now he’s occupying the ground they took.

            It’s just incredible the lengths people are going to excuse his flops when they didn’t excuse them in others.

          • indi2

            I am not sure why you are counting those old stories and not counting the new ones, as you call it “flops”. Well these are good flops and we welcome them as he flops. Reads his immigration speech again. It is a solid plan. It is incredible the lengths people are going to dwell on those irrelevant details and ignore the core messages he has developed delivered. Forget the past, and start listening. Unless of course you already shut your ears long time ago like most of the liberals.

          • Cato

            I’m simply pointing out you are as opportunistic as the establishment squishes.

          • Bunky

            Absolutely not true.
            He is starting with the criminals and maintains there is no path to legalization even if you’ve been here 25 years.
            All illegals have to go!
            Criminals first!

          • PhysicistVet

            “Rubio moved from the left toward the center”

            On IMMIGRATION ONLY.

            Other than that, Rubio is (if you look at his ACTIONS in the Senate) about as far right as they get, giving Cruz a run for his money in almost every area.

            Trump, taken in the context of his lifetime, has actually shifted severely to the RIGHT, not left, on nearly every issue for this campaign. For crying out loud, back in 2000, he denounced to Reform Party (after having voiced some support for them in the past before they got hijacked by their own set of extremists) for its racist overtones and the fact that too many racists had jumped into the party and embraced it as a white supremacy party back then, refusing to even consider them.

          • Kurt Boyer

            In this election there is a non-interventionist who wants to stop killing Muslims, albeit while restricting their immigration, running against a neo-conservative Democrat who has spent 20 years killing Muslims and will bomb, invade and kill many more.

            There are very rational arguments against Donald Trump being a savior, but any Muslim-hating white supremacist who doesn’t support Clinton is too stupid to find his own balls.

            Personally I think David Duke is just as misled by the media as anyone – he may be disappointed that Trump would not kill as many Muslims as Hillary has/would, but sees a Trump presidency as “chaos” which any fringe political group craves. It probably wouldn’t be chaos, but that’s the narrative.

          • Cato

            Supremacists don’t care how many people die in foreign lands. They care about how people are treated at home, and there’s probably no reason to believe he wouldn’t be more likely to satisfy them than Clinton in that regard. Still, David Duke is far from Trump’s biggest obstacle.

        • CincinnatiRIck

          “Just about everything you think you know about Trump is a fiction.”
          And, if true, that is primarily the fault of the public persona he has displayed.

        • J. Plante

          Severn, Trump doesn’t always come right out and explicitly say such-and-such, sometimes he just implies it through incendiary language and dog whistles, leaving an objective hearer to infer exactly what he intends.

          I agree that he doesn’t always say bigoted things, but only someone drinking the Kool Aid convinces him/herself that he’s saying something innocent each and every time.

          But, all that aside, he doesn’t seem to have a grasp on how government works; he’s had more business failures and bankruptcies than accomplishments. What do Trumpatrons see in him?

          I’m not trying to be argumentative, I’m just trying to understand.

      • CincinnatiRIck

        Yes, Trump handled it badly but he did NOT insult a fallen soldier. He DID insult the father who dishonored his son’s service by volunteering to be a partisan tool at the DNC. The father richly deserved it and my only regret was that Trump did not give him his just desserts more adroitly and call him and the Democrats out for exactly what they were doing.

        • Cato

          Just by ignoring him and letting the media of the right do it for him would have more than humiliated the family.

          Instead he had to go and confirm every swing voter’s suspicion that he hates Muslims and can’t put country above partisanship. You know that’s the narrative. And yeah, it sucks that that’s the inevitable conclusion, but… At the same time only a hugely undisciplined candidate goes on the attack like that.

          • CincinnatiRIck

            Well sure…that would be the appropriate strategy but a large part of his appeal is that lack of discipline. That translates to authenticity and he could never have secured the nomination without it.

          • Cato

            I think there’s no shift he could make that would scare away the people who think he’s authentic and have made that their voting issue. I further think there are few remaining people he will get with that strategy.

            He needs to persuade moderate types that he can restrain himself. There are people legitimately afraid that he’s a menace, and unless he can show them a reformed Trump they will flee to Clinton as the option that won’t blow up the Union and try again in 2020.

            Yes, it got him attention and traction in the primary. Now it’s time to win the general. Different voters, different strategy.

          • ohio granny

            Like the media would have criticized that muslim father. What planet are you living on?

          • Cato

            Not MSNBC or CNN. But Fox and Breitbart for sure. In any case, it probably would have been better to swallow his pride rather than confirm his bigotry to a hundred million Americans

          • CincinnatiRIck

            You’ve leapt from the analysis that a tactical blunder was committed to the conclusion of “bigotry.” That is no better than confounding the honor of the son who died in Iraq with the dishonorable use his father put his sacrifice to.

          • Cato

            I don’t think he’s a bigot, actually. Despite it all.

            But millions of people who would otherwise have been receptive now are persuaded beyond doubt that this is the case.

          • Scout Wellsrain

            Wrong. Two weeks later, how does that look?

            ISLAM IS INCOMPATIBLE WITH OUR CIVILIZATION. Those who pretend it is about “race” are intentionally obfuscating the issue for ideological reasons.

            There is no “magic dirt”, sorry.

          • CincinnatiRIck

            Its a little more complicated than that.

            The naïve notion that liberal democracy can take root and flourish in Islamic majority states is not hardly the sole folly of neocons. Their tactics and verbiage may differ but that was not a neocon addressing the faithful at Cairo University in 2009 and seeking to midwife the “Arab Spring.”

            The Obama administration naively saw what it wanted to see in affirmation of Obama’s personal ideology and sold us a pipe dream. The conflagration you see (outside of the remaining authoritarian regimes such as Saudi Arabia) is the real “Arab street.” We have traded our banal and corrupt “bad guys” for Islamicist bad guys over whom we have no influence.

            Peaceful Islamic apologists speak only for themselves and have no street credibility whatsoever. But they do play very nicely into the wishful thinking of those who, having long since failed to take religion seriously themselves, expect a commensurate urbanity and moderation from those who do. We blithely assume that it is the Moslem that is to assimilate. Wrong: They already coopted the Hebrew scripture and accounted for Christ as a minor prophet…leaving both in the ideological dust.

          • Scout Wellsrain

            Guess what? “Bigotry” is not “bad”. That’s the leftist playbook, using their “morality”.

            Would you have been “bigoted” against National Socialists “emigres” in ’43?

      • Bunky

        That’s preposterous.
        Not one of the 16 establishment types would even be close.

        • Cato

          A generic Republican would be doing much better right now. Kasich, Rubio, hell maybe even Cruz would be winning. Even old Jeb! could probably be beating the old hag. All it would have taken was discipline, and letting Clinton tank with scandal after scandal. Trump apparently doesn’t have an appetite for winning because he has none of it.

          If Obama could run for a third term he would be winning by 12 points.

          • Sophia F

            None of the other candidates would have won.

          • Bunky

            How can apparently sentient beings be so blindly obtuse?
            Those 16 candidates couldn’t beat Trump, yet they are going to beat hillary because … discipline!
            I doubt they could discipline their puppies.

          • PhysicistVet

            “Those 16 candidates couldn’t beat Trump, yet they are going to beat hillary because … discipline!”

            It’s more like rock paper scissors.

            Think of it like Trump=rock, Clinton=paper, any other GOP candidate=scissors.

            In a Clinton v ANY other GOP candidate it would have been more of an apples to apples comparison during campaigning. Even a Spam and dead spider sandwich would probably be polling fairly even with her if it was the GOP nominee simply based on her unfavorables and the polling data putting the massive numbers of her supporters saying their primary reason for supporting her as being their opposition to and/or FEAR OF Trump (ALWAYS the #1 answer when an option).

            Just consider the MASSIVE steaming piles of manure that keep piling up on a near daily basis with Clinton that the media and her campaign somehow are able to just brush aside or even completely ignore because . . . TRUMPACOLYPSE!

          • Bunky

            You can play your rock, paper, scissors game.
            All those other candidates couldn’t beat Trump.
            They certainly wouldn’t beat hillary either.
            It’s simple.
            The dem santa claus has the edge and it will take a strong man to convince people to get past that.
            The rest of the GOP field was a group of weak kneed, status quo establishment crock that was rejected.
            All they would have done is promised less santa claus, but wink wink, we’ll keep the status quo … just vote for us.
            That’s a winner for sure/sarc

          • PhysicistVet

            “All those other candidates couldn’t beat Trump.
            They certainly wouldn’t beat hillary either.
            It’s simple.”

            Wow.

            Simple.

            So simplistic.

            The whole world is ultra simplistic and there is no such thing as gray, right?

            I take it you have no clue about politics, politic science, political theory, POLLING DATA from the ENTIRETY OF THIS YEAR, the incumbent party handicap, or any of the myriad number of other complex and complicating factors and just ASSUME that Clinton is the bees knees and all the GOP people in the world stink, eh?

          • Bunky

            Political science, or political theory or politics makes my comment wrong … how?
            Just how is polling data from Jan and Feb relevant in Sept?
            I’ll stand by my comment.
            The 16 other Rep candidates couldn’t beat Trump and they wouldn’t beat hillary either.

          • PhysicistVet

            So, instead of backing your opinion, you attack my INFORMATION as WRONG and then restate it as being the only possible right interpretation without ANY supporting arguments or points by attempting to say everything I said in support of my contention must be wrong because YOU CLAIM IT IS WRONG.

            Did you even TRY to think about you comment before making it?

          • Bunky

            Empirical evidence should be enough for even the most obtuse.
            DJT did beat all 16 other candidates.
            Not one of the 16 candidates even came close.
            When it came down to the last two candidates, DJT actually trounced Ted.
            DJT is catching up in CURRENT polling with HRC which bodes well for the general election.
            You haven’t put forward anything other than gobbledygook that supports your position.
            The actual facts reinforce mine.

          • PhysicistVet

            “Empirical evidence should be enough for even the most obtuse.”

            You so silly.

            Do continue to compare apples to sides of beef and pretend you know how to engage in rational discussion while INSISTING that logical fallacy is the same as using “empirical” evidence.

            “You haven’t put forward anything other than gobbledygook that supports your position.”

            Calling something gobbledygook does not make it so. Watch: “Science is all gobbledygook.” Guess what, science is NOT goobledygook, despite the fact that I just wrote that it was (and before you entirely miss the point and assume I don’t believe in science, I DO take science quite seriously and was using this statement for illustrative purposes). Do try harder with your ATTEMPTS to insult/mock/condescend instead of using nothing more than logical fallacy to “make a point” without actually ever making any point other than “ME right. You wrong. Me smart. You dumb.”

          • Bunky

            Your “science” is gobbledygook.
            You know why?
            Because you don’t quote any.

          • PhysicistVet

            “Your “science” is gobbledygook.
            You know why?
            Because you don’t quote any.”

            It’s WIDELY AVAILABLE to those who care to look up the COLD HARD DATA.

            Want to call magnetic force gobbledygook because I say it exists and has vast sums of numerical data supporting it yet didn’t cite it?

          • Bunky

            Why don’t you posit some theorems from your freshman political science class and explain how it supports your positions then?

            Maybe you could show a couple of little pieces of the “vast sums of … COLD HARD DATA” that says any of the other 16 candidates would be beating hillary …

            You can’t because it’s all in your rich fantasy world but not in the real world.

          • PhysicistVet

            I’m done with you if all you can do is play the non sequitur and strawman game by taking things I’ve said, twisting them into different things I have not said but share a few key word similarities, and then act like a complete (expletive deleted) who can;t speak with any words that aren’t the EXACT SAME that would be used be an amateurish 4channer with limited experience.

            If you actually WANT a discussion involving actual data and actual debate, I am MORE than willing and actually would look forward to it, but you;ll have to convince me YOU are even remotely interested, something you have provided ZERO indication of to date. So if you DO have an interest, try a bit harder to show it and reply with a comment that does ANYTHING to give some actual indication and we’ll BEGIN.

          • Bunky

            You wrote;

            “Think of it like Trump=rock, Clinton=paper, any other GOP candidate=scissors.”

            That’s the sum total of your argument.

            You got smug and delusion down pat.
            There is no reason to discuss anything with you.

          • PhysicistVet

            “You got smug and delusion down pat.”

            Reading into it what you WANT to read, and ignoring everything else in my lengthy and nuanced comments that doesn’t fit your DESIRED and pre-conceived NEED to paint me a certain way to justify your hate as you DEMAND I meet your ridiculously oversimplified cartoon caricature version of what SOMEONE WHO ISN’T YOU simply MUST believe so that I can be the opposite of you in order to rationalize your attempts to paint me as a lesser human being.

            Par for the course.

          • Cato

            When a person with universal name recognition runs against a splintered field in a first past the post system, tragedies can happen.

            This election will be lost, and it’s simply frustrating because just about anyone could have won besides Trump.

          • Bunky

            Sure.
            I can imagine JEB! running away with it now.
            All the dems would be crying for him?
            As another 5 million conservatives stay home again.
            I’ld say the same for all the rest.

          • ElaineDr

            Except that “anyone else” couldn’t win the nomination.

            You probably think your team that lost to the AFC champions could have beat the NFC champs in the Super Bowl, because those NFC guys were so weak. It’s a fact-free argument.

          • Cato

            Sure, any number of other candidates could have won the primary. A prisoners dilemma emerged where none of them were willing to drop out to let the other win. That does not mean, as happy a delusion that is was, that Trump was the strongest candidate or the ultimate strongest.

          • ElaineDr

            “any number of other candidates could have won the primary”
            Sorry, but that is an opinion, not a fact. A happy delusion, even.

  • JHX

    Bravo!

    • blatantplayer

      Wsup. rico, leaves, pierce, araddah, sekmet would disagree with this article vehemently.

      • JHX

        Yeah, I doubt you’ll see much of them over here.

        • wildbillcuster

          Yeah, they’ll stay in their safe space.

  • celli

    you got it, and exactly why we’d vote for Trump.

    • vaccinia

      Since I know how to manipulate the financial system for my benefit under pretty much any guise, I can say that I would likely be better off with a hillary elitist regime. But the country won’t…..that’s why I’ll vote for Trump, even this Ivy Ph.D. knows that after the obaminator, the republic will be destroyed by another Ivory tower unrealistic Prog, who is a neocon to boot.

      • CincinnatiRIck

        The problem lies with an elite in two coastal enclaves and a capital city that have profited mightily at the expense of everyone else, an elite that has contempt for flyover America and smugly condescends to force its superior wisdom on it: “we know better what is good for you than you do.” However flawed, Trump is the vehicle for an uprising of the peasantry. Most often, those uprisings don’t succeed but when they do (Jackson 1828), the change can be earth-shaking.

        • vaccinia

          Malo periculosam, libertatem quam quietam servitutem.
          Even this evil is productive of good. It prevents the degeneracy of
          government, and nourishes a general attention to the public affairs. I
          hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing, and as
          necessary in the political world as storms in the physical.1 Unsuccesful
          rebellions indeed generally establish the incroachments on the rights
          of the people which have produced them. An observation of this truth
          should render honest republican governors so mild in their punishment of
          rebellions, as not to discourage them too much. It is a medecine
          necessary for the sound health of government.” – Thomas Jefferson to James Madison, Paris, January 30, 17872

  • walkergw

    I wonder who your readership is. Are you preaching to the choir, are you trying to convince people you are right?

    What I know you are not is; objective. I find this article to be a bigger bowl of hogwash than what you are decrying against.

    Your number one inexcusable mistake in this article is declaring trump supporters a single voting faction that proves the conservatives wrong in not supporting Trump. Here is an inescapable truth for you. The majority of the people who say they will vote for Trump don’t like him. They just find Clinton a worse choice.

    The effect of this is enormous on the validity of your article. Sites like National Review are correct in some ways. They blame the establishment that you are supporting for allowing Trump to gain the candidacy. For this they are one hundred percent correct. The party bowed to the demagogue Trump and you along with them. Trump is a cancer to the party that we will all have to deal with. Not recognizing this will make the problem take longer to clean up.

    On the otherhand, you are not completely wrong either. The majority of the Republican Party are not conservative. They certainly are not as conservative as they often state they are. Conservatives need to realize they are the minority. Such terms as Rino need to be banished from the party lexicon. They increase the party divide.

    A new party needs to be built for the people right of center. Trump and his band of surrogates can not be the base of this change. They do the opposite of unify. Until you realize this, you will be part of the problem and not part of the solution.

    • William Devan

      The republican party you want is dead. You can thank both Bushes, Boehner, McConnell, McCain, Romney and now Ryan. All of these have pretended to be conservative and have sold us out in every chance they could. Sorry, but the Republican party of old made Trump. We can no longer truly trust anyone in power in the party so we have gone to the only person available from the outside.
      Just look how they are acting now. Traitors all. Even Cruz, the one supposed real conservative, even sold out the party, and by party I mean the voters, not the elite politicians, when he was the last “chosen” savior of the elite. If he truly represented us, he would have brokered a deal with Trump, not the establishment.

      • walkergw

        The real traitors are the so called conservatives who have sold out to Trump. He cares for no one or nothing beyond himself and his family. If you don’t understand this, he will keep taking from you until you have nothing left. Those who have seen through him can never support him completely. Anyone who can support him fully will be taken for a ride. Hope you have your seat belt on. You will all wish you had listened earlier. That is without a doubt. And when you come to realize you have been had, Those of us who knew better will have nothing to offer. You are to blame for your own demise, Trump is just your choice of suicide.

        • jacknyc

          ZZZZZzzzzz……..

        • SensibleStater

          Definitely think that you are off the mark on this one. I think that he truly wants to make this country great for the average American. Even if I turn out to be wrong, the worst case with Trump is at least an order of magnitude better than Clinton.

    • jacknyc

      death to NR

      • walkergw

        Long live Breitbart and the neonazi alt-right. Happy?

        • jacknyc

          the neonazi right is six guys in a diner

          the neo nazi left is fifty million hillary voters

        • Severn

          How come all of you self-described “true conservatives” always walk and talk exactly like garden-variety leftists?

    • Severn

      The majority of the people who say they will vote for Trump don’t like him.

      Since when was “liking” ever a requirement to voting for a politician? I don’t think I’ve ever voted for a politician I “liked” in my life.

      The majority of people voting for Trump, and even many people NOT voting for Trump, agree with him on the issues. That is supposed to be what people base their voting decisions on, not whether you’d like candidate X marrying your sister.

      The majority of the Republican Party are not conservative.

      They are conservative. They’re just not “conservatives” in the bastardized sense that that word is employed by the neocons and libertarians, who are small in numbers but have wielded hugely disproportionate influence in the party up to now. People who want to conservae America the country and Americans the people are conservative. Who who are indifferent or hostile to those goals are anti-conservative.

  • gmonsen

    Loved the article, except the obvious lack of understanding of the mortgage crisis. That was something created by Clinton’s Community Reinvestment Act and the fostered by Fannie, Freddie, and Ginnie promoting and buying mortgages that should never have been made. The fact that Wall Street bought mortgages that the GSE’s wanted, securitized them or sold them to the GSE’s and profited from that activity is not Wall Street’s fault. It is the Federal Government’s fault. Wall Street simply plays by rules and policies the federal government gives them. They, of course, always go to the edge of all the rules, but that is all about optimization and the rules of the game are set for Wall Street by elected officials and the bureaucrats they appoint.

    • marque2

      Yeah, it was started under Carter even and enhanced under Clinton and Bush, but if you don’t believe wall street had something to do with lobbying for and writing those bills, I have some derivatives (a bridge) to sell you.

      • CincinnatiRIck

        I think you fail to appreciate the essentially defensive or reactionary nature of the participation of the banks in the process. Necessity is the mother of invention: the banks made lemonade out of the lemons forced on them by the CRA. In exchange for eschewing the fight against politically mandated loans in the first place…they relented because they had a place to lay off their risk while pocketing the origination fees. Everyone was happy: the banks, the politicians, their clients in the civil rights industry and their cronies on Wall Street. But that resulted in the tranches being larded with more risk than they otherwise would have had…leaving a house of cards when the music stopped.

        This is what inevitably happens when people think they can do their charity with other people’s money (and maybe skim a little for themselves in the process). There is no free lunch…someone must pay for it. And it’s not the politicians, their cronies or those who didn’t have anything to begin with.

        • MNJAM

          Banks are always the fall guys. No good deed (which is all bankers do) goes unpunished.

          • CincinnatiRIck

            Bankers are rational and look after their own best interests. So they found a way out of the bind they were put in. The blame for the bad outcome rests with those who attempted to do their charity with other people’s money. Surely, you didn’t expect the bankers to end up holding the bag.

      • gmonsen

        What CincinnatiRick says is largely acceptable. I was a somewhat of a player in the Wall Street mortgage markets from about 1989-1998. So, I know what happened all round. Very directly. We did not lobby or very much influence the bills you are referring to. Rather, we became very, very close to those who ran Fannie, Freddie, and Ginnie.

        • mebenhack

          Also very incestuous with the Fed and Treasury. “Skim a little?” Have you seen the salaries and bonuses of those at the top of the GSE’s?

          I say “don’t hate the player, hate the game” but in this case there’s plenty of blame to go around. When the players are sleeping with the umpires who are doing the managers and their wives it gets a little confusing (which I suspect is not a bug but a feature of this cozy little arrangement.)

      • MNJAM

        It started under Carter, it was created under Clinton, but it happened under Bush. Why is that? Is just that Bush was too stupid to recognize and staunch the storm created by his predecessors? Or was it really his storm? How can one tell?

        • James

          Mass homeownership was something that both Republicans and Democrats liked. For Democrats, it was a politically acceptable plan to encourage a more equal distribution of wealth through homeownership. For Republicans, it was because homeowners are more likely to agree with Republican values and vote Republican than renters.

          Conservatives like to blame bleeding hearts for trying to put everyone in a house, but they should be careful what they wish for, they might just get it. If we become a nation of renters, then how much of a stake in the economy would this new “renting class” have? How do you think this will impact their vote? What do you think this will hold for their future.

    • whidbeytom

      Wall Street was up to their necks in the fraudulent instruments they sold. This had a direct effect on the crash of 2008. And I ask, just how many crooks did the Obama Administration indict? One. And how many crooks did Republicans request the DOJ to charge for fraud? None.

      It may be naive to think, but Trump is the only politician who isn’t owned by Wall Street and other huge donors. HRC is up to her neck in donations ($145 in August alone) from “special interests” who will come calling if she is elected.

      Trump is the only politician who has a chance to clean up this cesspool.

      Hopefully, he would instruct the DOJ to take a second look at Lady Clinton’s actions while SOS.

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  • CincinnatiRIck

    Established (old) wealth, by and large, doesn’t mind tax increases. They can either find a way around them and, even to the extent they don’t, they can afford to be cavalier about a few crumbs thrown off the table. The cost is just a premium they gladly pay to keep the ship of state on an even keel…a cost of doing business and continuing their lives of comfort and excess. Let’s not forget that it was German Chancellor Prince Otto Von Bismarck who invented Social Security and our own silver spoon “patrician” FDR who imported it here..

    No, the people who feel and fear tax increases are the strivers, the upwardly mobile, those who are trying to build the American dream for themselves and, coincidentally (though seldom a matter of conscious intent), make opportunities for others.

    There’s nothing wrong with Kansas. The problem lies with an elite that has contempt for flyover America and smugly condescends to force its superior wisdom on it: “we know better what is good for you than you do.”

    • anb1

      ….and that is Trump, with his contempt for free markets.

      How dare you consumers buy foreign made products–I’m going to make sure that you can’t because it will cure the awful trade deficit! Trump’s followers might be different, but they just want to kowtow to a fuhrer the same as the left does. Both leftists and Trumpkins have contempt for liberty.

      • gmonsen

        If you really feel comfortable displaying this level of ignorance, its alright with me, but you really have to distort logic and reality to equate what the left thinks about the role of liberty with what the right thinks. I’m rather embarrassed for you.

        • anb1

          You may want to consider being embarrassed for yourself. You know nothing about the right, so stop pretending and get the hell out of my party.

          • vaccinia

            Your party? Better buckle up Dorothy….cause Kansas, it’s going Bye-Bye!

      • taek1

        Your fear is palpable.

      • None of the Above

        Thanks for confirming once again that Trump is nothing more than Obama for White People.

        • anb1

          Thanks for agreeing with me.

    • MNJAM

      Exactly. The hereditary rich — eg.the Mars family an the Mellons — treat tax increases with perfect aplomb. The newly rich Silicon valley types fight them all the way.

    • James

      But it is also the upwardly mobile who benefit from tax expenditures. Infrastructure spending makes it easier for ambitious people to create jobs. How many opportunities does a new highway create? A new airport?

      The upwardly mobile have a workforce trained at a discount in publicly supported colleges (or by subsidized private schools). There is a reason why Silicon Valley is so close to UC-Berkeley and Stanford.

      Because it IS hard work to build the American dream, people forget just how much help they got along the way.

      • CincinnatiRIck

        Clearly, the “little people” are tired of being told by their “betters” where their true interests lie or that the economy THEY are experiencing is doing well. The infrastructure you crow about is crumbling and even third world. You have a concentration of wealth, privilege, corruption and deviation from traditional mores in two coastal enclaves and a Capital City. With a strategy of judiciously throwing crumbs off the table to buy social peace, they have prospered enormously at the expense of the rest of the country and now we are seeing a populist revolt, however imperfect their would-be Messiah(s)…Bernie and Trump. It’s not exactly the “Hunger Games” but the analogy will do.

  • Pingback: How Elites Rationalize This Year's Voter Rebellion - Godzlla()

  • Bob Acker

    As it says in Two Corinthians, wisdom may be found in the dumpster behind the bumper sticker factory. Not.

  • Christopher_Graves

    Chris Buskirk hit the nail on the head on a number of fronts.

  • mhjhnsn

    This has been a very clarifying year. I’ve learned a lot about many people, not least myself.

    One little thing I have learned is that Bret Stephens is a vile man who lacks the ability to look honestly at himself.

    “It used to be that Americans looked askance at people who pointed fingers at everyone but themselves.”

    Indeed, Mr. Stephens, indeed. Some of us still do, and there you stand.

  • swek

    demographics are the key driver in lowering the labor participation rate. a mandatory or optional retirement age in the low 60s, coupled with an aging population, has driven the participation rate down faster and more permanently than any other single element.

    • None of the Above

      Sure, because everyone knows the Oval Office puppet who spent weeks playing footsie with the elites on Martha’s Vineyard while Baton Rouge drowned had absolutely nothing to do with job destruction for the past eight years, amiright?

      Your salad days are over, regressive. Better start getting used to it.

  • bluesdoc70

    Well said. And SPOT ON.

  • jacknyc

    popularity of this site is Trump’s popularity

  • Joe Jones

    Good article. Thanks

  • Dan Warren

    How Hot, Smart Women See # NeverTrumpers……

    One Picture is Worth 1000 Words….

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/28815267334/in/dateposted-public/

    [Make this Meme go Viral ! …….the Media will simply NOT ALLOW Donald Trump’s and the American People’s message to be heard or seen ……it is ALL up to us and Donald ……and, he’s already doing everything he can………we need to get the message out to ALL our family, friends, and acquaintances…….ONLY a few more than 60 days and counting !]

    I would appreciate any feedback on this meme…..what do you think of it?….Will you use this and send it to people in your social network?…..do you think it might have an effect on your friends you share it with?….thanks.

    ⤵ Also, do you like this?

    • Dan Warren

      Seriously? – the Libertarian guy?

      One Picture is worth 1000 words…..

      https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/27492676764/in/dateposted-public/

      [Make this Meme go Viral ! …….the Media will simply NOT ALLOW Trump’s and the American People’s message to be heard or seen ……it is ALL up to us and Donald ……and he’s already doing everything he can…we need to get the message out to ALL our family, friends, and acquaintances]

      A local talk show host played the interview with Johnson, where he got livid with the journalist for using the phrase ‘illegal alien’, over and over again, laughing at this idiot, pointing out that Johnson isn’t ‘Libertarian’….rather his ideas conform right along with the radical Leftist buffoons, particularly about NOT having borders, and just letting whomever wants in to come in and do whatever, go on welfare, do crimes, get cash jobs while the American taxpayer subsidizes them with benefits from A to Z.

      Here is the video….watch it for some laughs…..

      https://www.youtube.com/embed/_hoM_TfkCcI

      This guy Johnson is a dangerous threat to the USA !

      We need Trump….and a vote for this moron is, in effect, a vote for Hil liar y !

      Vote Trump to SAVE America !

  • JamesDrouin

    Great article … now the question is; are the elites capable of “learning”.

    • SensibleStater

      There is nothing for them to learn. They are just looking out for their best interests. They have to be beaten on election day.

  • Wyomingdude

    Wall Street did not create the mortgage pyramid scheme. The federal government did by encouraging banks to produce ever riskier loans to marginally qualified people. It then bought the mortgage paper back via Fannie and Freddie. Wall Street certainly profited from the pyramid scheme but didn’t create it. Otherwise, great article.

  • ricocat1

    The GOP, and hopefully Democrat, elites should realize that our anger is indeed directed at their failed policies. Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders are merely our messengers.

  • Nick Fury

    cui bono not qui bono. Sorry to be an elitist Latin nerd. It’s a Double Dative. Enjoyed the article. Cautiously optimistic for Trump. Obviously better than Hillary.

  • RJenIL

    The rebellion is not yet complete. If it doesn’t culminate this election cycle, it will get stronger and stronger until it prevails. Sooner or later the stuffed shirts will listen: ENOUGH!

  • odys

    Good article. I say, if we are to have free trade, then we need to allow the worker to compete. Trump understands the onerous burden of regulations and mandates. Couple that with the new Republican law that all major regulatory changes must be passed by Congress before they go into effect, and we are on the brink of making some significant progress.

    • jmquillian

      Possibly. I sure as heck don’t trust the GOP anymore – not one whit. Let’s see what the establishment does when Obama tries to force TPP through Congress.

      • whidbeytom

        He won’t. He’ll use executive order to try to implement it

  • Turbo

    Devastating rejoinder to the insufferable Stephens, who never met an Israeli policy he did not love or an American grass roots movement he did not disdain.

  • Times Up

    My, my, my……..won’t the Elites be surprised on Election Day, sort of like the Brexit vote.

  • Packard27

    Anyone who is living in one of America’s top 10% households [annual income >$160K and a net worth (sans primary residence & vehicles) measured with seven numbers] has to admit that these past eight years under our first constitutional scholar Presdient have been pretty darn good to them and their portfolios. Hillary promises four more years of the same.

    Vote for Hillary: She may be a liar and a crook, but as our next President, we confidently predict that she will be “our liar” and “our crook”…if you get my meaning?

    Otherwise, follow the wisdom and money of Hillary’s most sincere supporters; Warren Buffett, Jamie Dimon, Larry Fink, Lloyd Blankfein, Tim Cook, Mark Zuckerberg, Mike Bloomberg, Jeff Immelt, and Bill Gates. These men all know that while their Clinton money will always talk, all else will simply walk.

    • CincinnatiRIck

      Clearly, the “little people” are tired of being told by their “betters” where their true interests lie. You have a concentration of wealth, privilege and deviation from traditional values in two coastal enclaves and a Capital City. With a strategy of judiciously throwing crumbs off the table to buy social peace, they have prospered enormously at the expense of the rest of the country but the bill is coming due in a populist revolt, however imperfect their would-be Messiah(s). It’s not exactly the “Hunger Games” but the analogy will do.
      I’m a (marginal) member of the much maligned 1% but I’m with the peasantry on this. Here’s hoping this is 1828 and not 1824.

      • Packard27

        Instead, let me suggest 1788 Versailles.

        • CincinnatiRIck

          Might work for you…not for me. Fortunately, we have constitutional safety valves for our peasant’s discontent. But I appreciate your sentiment.

          • Packard27

            Safety valves work right up until the moment that they don’t.

            Nevertheless, let’s both hope for the best, but still prepare for the worst.

  • LiberalsLIE

    Great article. Amazing to read an article from any publication that actually says it like it is. I’m surprised the Liberal media and our current dictators in office haven’t managed to nix this one.

  • wildbillcuster

    Great article, keep them coming.

  • nolawyers1

    I doubt that 80% of Republican voters are Trump voters. They just got fed him and now have to eat him or Hillary they are told. If free, they might vote third party.

  • Leslie B

    The elites don’t get it, never got it, and never will get it. This is why history is strewn with revolts of the people against the elites.

    The people aren’t jealous – they’re angry. And they are going to stay angry until the system starts treating them more fairly.

    We’ve all been sold a pack of lies: “Just work hard and the system will reward you.” Throughout history there have been millions upon millions of hard-working people who got nowhere. Historically, the turning point has been when all those people got together and figured out they’d been equally screwed by the elites. Thanks to the Internet, we’re all figuring it out a little sooner this time around.

    Torches and pitchforks anyone? It’s time to storm the castle walls!

  • manute777

    “All the boats didn’t rise. The benefits of globalism have been concentrated at the very top and the very bottom. The wealthy, powerful, and connected have grown wealthier, more powerful . . . And at the bottom, government benefits have grown steadily richer even as the working and middle class have lost ground. * * *

    * * * median household income in inflation adjusted dollars peaked in 1999 at $57,483 and has fallen to $53,657 in the latest data compiled by the U.S. Census.”

    Globalism certainly is a major cause of middle class discontent, but not the ONLY cause. Also, there are proposals to cut Social Security & Medicare benefits (Cf. Paul Ryan), unwinnable foreign wars (Iraq, Vietnam, Syria), unjustifiable tax breaks for the rich (eg, carried interest, max 15% tax on qualified dividends), Affirmative Action (which is perceived as flat out anti White/Asian discrimination)., law breaking, job stealing immigrants, etc.

    Now that Trump has galvanized these previously reliable GOP voters, aka the GOP Grass Roots, I doubt most of them ever will revert to supporting the agenda of the GOP Establishment, an agenda that they have now soundly rejected.

  • PissedOffAmerican302

    ?? Trump – Pence ??
    Make America Great Again!

    Trump – The “hope and change scam” middle finger payback to all the loons for the last 8 years!!!

  • Tanuge

    Diagnosis is pretty good, but prescribing 4-8 years of Trump to cure it is like putting leeches on a patient suffering from influenza.

  • KTexas

    Great work Chris! You get it!!!

  • Monte

    “It isn’t Republican voters who have changed, it is Republican leaders”

    When the old elites are banished, will there be new elites?

    • RonRonDoRon

      Of course there will. With any luck, the will have been put on notice (though that has to happen periodically).

  • Poseidon

    Excellent article. I don’t like the use of ‘elite’ to label those, but I guess it’s become a pejorative, not a compliment.

    We’ve always opposed illegal immigration, demanded deportation and enforcement of our laws. When did so many Republicans change on those?

    I used to always support and defend free trade and immigration, and prospect of lower prices, free markets, higher quality, … blah, blah, blah, but it doesn’t help when you lose your programming job to a foreigner and can’t find a job in your field. The cost of living has skyrocketed. Crime is soaring. I’m not racist, but they continue to accuse me of hating minorities and immigrants and of being xenophobic. I don’t blame the immigrants or employers. I hate the govt for allowing all this happen. I blame the govt. I blame the politicians.

  • RonRonDoRon

    Yes, it’s always “them” – “those people” – the “lower classes.”

    Goes all the way back to “The peasants are revolting!”

  • Bernardo

    When I run into someone who is anti-Trump, I love to ask, “Why do you think he got all these votes?” The left cannot see things from others’ perspective (and that is why there are speech codes at campuses) and the right cannot see how their actions when they led government (2002-2006) adversely affected the citizenry.

    • PV Maro

      What you say is true – the left has been avoiding policy debates and instead resort to ad hominem attacks, and they’ve done it for so long that they have lost the ability to engage intellectually at all.

      When it comes to debates, I wish that we could go back to rules that were followed by the Scholastics of the High Middle Ages (they called debates “disputations).

      A scholar was not allowed to advance his own argument until he had first restated his opponent’s argument TO THE OPPONENT’S SATISFACTION. If the scholar misstated the position in any way, his opponent would have a further opportunity to state his position in an effort to get the scholar to understand. Being publicly corrected never looks good, so they made every effort to get it right – which also meant that when a debate happened, the two sides were talking about the same things.

  • JDL

    Path of other Republicans to another gentlemanly loss:
    Cruz–abortion stance disqualified him
    Rubio–no experience whatsoever
    Bush–another Bush, another middle east war?
    Christie–“bridgegate”
    Kaisich–condescending to women
    Graham–hawk
    …and on and on and on.
    Trump is not just a reaction to the elites, but a wholesale rejection of traditional Republicanism including evangelical Christianity, opposition to abortion and gay marriage, and global projection of American power. Securing the border, enforcing immigration laws, negotiating trade, a strong but defensive military, and limiting the scope of the federal government are the new and emerging ‘Republican’ trends over which the party is quite likely to fracture. ‘True conservative’ is now a term reserved for a true minority with an endless list of requirements, the lack of any one of which is automatically disqualifying.

  • mistermcfrugal

    Wishful thinking. The people are going to elect the person whom the fix is for. That would be Hillary. I see little sign that the majority of people aren’t buying all the media lies about Trump.

    Americans have got to be unbelievably stupid to worship a liar like Clinton. They will deserve all the bad things that happen as a result of electing her.

  • MNJAM

    “Before the globalist agenda was implemented the Labor Force Participation Rate hovered between 66 and 67 percent. It has declined steadily since 2000 to its current 62.7%. Likewise, median household income in inflation adjusted dollars peaked in 1999 at $57,483 and has fallen to $53,657 in the latest data compiled by the U.S. Census.”

    The “globalist agenda” has been “implemented” since 1945. It can’t explain labor force particiation rates. They have been delining for men since the 1950s. They rose for women through 2000 or so, then began to decline for them. Neither trend matches “globalization.” Both seem rooted in demographics.

    Globalization does not explain changes in median household income. The 1990s were an era of roaring globalization and rising median household income. The first decade of the 21st century was an era of roaring globalization and dropping household income.

    The standard diagnoses and prescriptions we are being offered, whether “liberal” or “conservative,” are intellectually bankrupt and empirically worthless. That’s the problem.

  • TripleKidney

    So voters will demonstrate their disdain for, and rebellion against the elites, by electing the epitome, the personification of elite-ness?
    Mr. Buskirk should send a fruit basket to RCP. 😉

    • PV Maro

      I don’t think the voters who are angry at the elites plan to vote for Hillary.

    • CincinnatiRIck

      “the personification of elite-ness”????
      Get a clue: Trump is the personification of the uber nouveau riche peasantry. If he were in Hollywood, he’d be a Kardashian, not a Barrymore.

  • wheretonow

    Whether Trump wins or loses, I hope this kind of thinking can either prevail in the GOP or form the basis for the party that replaces it.

  • ClawhammerJake

    Hillary will win the election. Nothing will change except the new names for the new wars.
    And in some rich enclave someone will say “my profit, and not yours” … “your son, and not mine”.

  • KarenNOLA

    Try this instead: But it’s simpler than that; in fact, this is Occam’s Razor at its simplest….
    Its hallmarks are elite rule through the administrative state…

  • James

    Rebellions have an unfortunate history of trading bad for worse.

    Get rid of the King, end up with Napoleon.
    Get rid of the Tsar, end up with Stalin.

    Don’t say you weren’t warned.

  • Lanfranco Cantagalli

    Great Analysis !

  • Keyser Soze

    outstanding, great article, and so true. TRUMP 2016

  • Cato

    “It isn’t Republican voters who have changed, it is Republican leaders.”

    This is probably the most true part of this article. But rather than serving as a point of pride, it ought to be read with shame.

    The world is changing, and a bunch of voters who think the economic, social, and foreign policies of the past century can be brought back are drinking the kool-aid. Trump will not save you. Learning some new skills might.

    If you are concerned about your rights, nominating a man hated by two thirds of the country is a sure way to lose the Supreme Court.

    If you are concerned about the loss of morals, rebuild your own communities. The government cannot destroy your culture without your consent.

    But for the love of God, stop blaming everyone else. You get the leadership you deserve.

    • James

      A large part of Trump’s popularity is that he made the politics of victimhood acceptable for white people, especially white men.

      Same garbage, different pile.

    • Dan Warren

      How Hot, Smart Women See # NeverTrumpers……

      One Picture is Worth 1000 Words….

      https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/28815267334/in/dateposted-public/

      [Make this Meme go Viral ! …….the Media will simply NOT ALLOW Donald Trump’s and the American People’s message to be heard or seen ……it is ALL up to us and Donald ……and, he’s already doing everything he can………we need to get the message out to ALL our family, friends, and acquaintances…….ONLY a few more than 60 days and counting !]

      ⤵ Also, do you like this?

  • csmats

    The stupid Republican elites don’t understand that if Trump loses the Republican Party is over. I guess what would you expect from the dolts who drove the country into a ditch to begin with?

  • Patrice Couture

    Beautifully said.

  • T Gentry

    Best article I have read about this year’s election.

  • Dizz

    I am a lifelong Republican. When the party was taken over by a toxic marriage of the neocons and the entrenched, we suffered the results. They controlled the White House, the Congress, and the Supreme Court for six long years – 2000 to 2006. And the results were disastrous. Two ill-conceived invasions on flawed (to be kind) intelligence, no war budgeting, no revenue generation for the wars, huge and ongoing gifts to the pharmaceutical industry, no bid contracts in the billions to Cheney’s revolving door company, Goldman Sachs door revolver at the helm for the collapse of the mortgage market – all laying the groundwork for the great recession. When the Republican Party had the power to address immigration, federal spending, and tax reform, they did nothing. Except of course to spend money like inebriated mariners. Fast forward to Trump. The elites may not like him, but that doesn’t mean that this newly-minted GOP member can or should lead the party’s change of direction. Would I lend money to him? Does he display a thoughtful, rational intellect? Have I seen his income tax returns? Does he comport himself as a world leader? Are his statements truthful? After the failures of McCain and Romney, the GOP should have figured out its path. Here is where the reality of decades of anger promotion by media mentioned above comes in to play.

  • Rocky Rocketeer

    Well written.. A lot of accurate points here that I have been making for years .. And I’m a liberal..

  • Exposures

    My first time here as well. Thank you for a pretty good assessment of why the elites hate We the People. The gems and repubs are 2 sides of the same corrupt, self-centered coin. They fight in public & shake hands behind closed doors, while Americans get stuck with paying their way. Thank you Chris Buskirk for your insight.

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  • douginsd

    As one call center operator said in a Brexit exit poll, as quoted by Daniel Hannan: “It’s the working classes against the smirking classes”

  • Controse

    Great finish to a good article.

  • DunFaden

    … all this “high~minded” finger pointing is yet another iteration of the endlessly repeating “blame~game” which rarely offers any hint of a constructive path forward.
    … here’s a data point from here and now, from across the fruited plain:
    There are Vast numbers of “the nation’s newest victim class” who know quite well how NOT to be “victim”:

    They are obtaining pitchforks at an unprecedented pace

    …Humm, do I recall Soros investing in ammunition manufacturers 2 ~ 3 years ago?

  • Robin Marlena

    As a big Donald Trump supporter, surrounded by many other Republicans who are on the Trump Train, I can assure you that if he doesn’t win in November, ALL OF US will switch to Independent and let the GOP go to hell!!! How dare these elite Republicans snub their nose at the majority of Republicans who turned out in primaries to cast their vote for Donald Trump! In 2008, I supported John “Amnesty” McCain and in 2012, I supported Mitt “Father of Obamacare” Romney – neither were my first choice. To allow Crooked Hillary to win and destroy this nation rather than support Donald Trump is beyond discussion. Shame on the GOP elite who I hope have a future as successful as Green Party candidate Dr. Jill Stein. GO DONALD TRUMP!!!

  • BJOSEPHS

    The elites believe the hoi polloi should be satisfied with ever cheaper flat screen TV’s and T shirts from Bangladesh. Will the average voter be better off under a more nationalist approach? I am not sure, but i know what will get with a continued globalist approach. If you or your children want to work at dollar stores, used car lots, pay day loan companies, or collection agencies vote Clinton.

  • FightingSiouxMike

    You’ve gotta love the irony and hypocrisy of the hippies of the 1960’s supporting the ESTABLISHMENT candidate! F****** Priceless.

  • Lee

    The “disconnect between voters and elites” was noted some years ago in the book “The Revolt of the Elites” by Christopher Lasch. Only now, however, do we witness the economic consequences. Good article.

  • indi2

    Wow! One of the best out of hundreds of articles I have read recently. I wish Trump campaign can effectively make its argument in the same manner. Only a few words effectively describe what Trump’s visions and policies are all about and I quote it here: “.. a platform of border control, common
    sense trade deals that put the interests of American citizens ahead of
    Wall Street, and an American nationalism that believes this country is
    at its best when citizens are served by government not the other way
    around.” The message has to be broadcasted all over again and again. It Trump can turn out lots of those forgotten voters, Hillary stands no chance. Many elites will jump off the cliff in disbelief. Time has come!

  • acidulous

    Bravo.

  • James Francisco

    “Calling a super-majority of Republican voters the nation’s newest victim class” Seriously, there was no super-majority. Trump got 13.3M votes out of 29.5M votes. That’s called a plurality because he did not get a majority of the votes. This kind of electoral math supports the urgent need for two changes to GOP rules. First, no open primaries. If you want to vote in a GOP primary, you should be registered as a GOP voter. The second rule change would be no winner-take-all if no one gets over 50% of the vote.

    • CincinnatiRIck

      I have the perfect solution to keep the nominating process from going off the rails: Superdelegates 🙂

  • soapyjeansy

    If the elites cause Trump to lose then the republican party is done, finished, caput. Because if Trump loses, that means crooked Hillary will stack the supreme court with leftwing libs and destroy our constitution as we know it. There is no coming back from that for republicans. Republicans will forever be blamed for handing the supreme court to Hillary!!!

  • soapyjeansy

    Elites are too stupid to realize their fervor against Trump is tantamount to Marie antoinette telling the french citizens let them eat cake. And elites are already disliked, but if they hand the sc to crooked Hillary and cause the end of the 2 party system by killing the republican party… I don’t think it will be pretty, lol…

  • SPQR_US

    Globalist Elite is spelled: C-U-C-K in English…

  • salemst

    Best political article explaining what’s going on in the GOP I’ve read for the 2016 election.
    Chris Buskirk nails it 100%. I’m coming back to this site.

  • mdyou

    This is the simplified version of Codevilla. On point.

  • PoliticallyAcceptableTarget

    Bam!

  • Don John

    Although I agree with some of the commenters that you’re not quite right on the causes of the Crash of 2008, I really enjoyed the article overall. Just one other quibble: it’s Cui Bono, not Qui Bono.
    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cui%20bono
    You’re in good company: I’ve also had the effrontery to correct a foreign phrase used by Victor Davis Hanson, and another one by Thomas Sowell.

  • So It Goes

    Well said. The other wing to the rebellion is cultural. The insistence by the broad middle that it belongs and it counts, against the slow poison of liberal disdain, over decades. Whites, males, moderates, conservatives churchgoers, heteronormatives, and people who like Trump’s addressing, and not dilution of, the very clear problem of Islamic terror.

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  • basno

    Republican got control in 2000 when Bush was elected. What we got was a great expansion of government. New entitlements, no child left behind, new government agencies and an enormous increase in welfare spending. Then republicans after voting like progressive lost the congress. Their next campaign was we learned our lesson give us another chance. With majorities in the house and senate they were barely a speed bump for Obama to roll over with his executive orders, abuse of power with IRS targeting of conservatives and yes even caved on their one victory the sequester.
    The republican establishment only proved one thing. They are irrelevant and stand for nothing.

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  • damianmcglynn

    same here. brilliant. am adding to my favorites and sharing with friends.

  • ElaineDr

    This blog is fantastic. Thank you to Claremont and Steven Hayward for pointing me here.

  • Frank La Rocca

    bookmarking this blog — how wonderful to discover such intelligent voices and good thinking.

  • Mary Petnel

    Excellent!

  • bilejones

    What sort of dipship equates Putin with Erdogan?

  • Sean

    So much painful truth for the WSJ in this article.

  • vaccinia

    At least SOMEONE gets it!

  • Derek Pandamonium

    A great article.

  • BamaGirl

    AMEN, HALLELUHA, BRAVO! Perfection on so many levels! Thank you for your candid, well-researched, professionally stated & OBJECTIVE summary of the glaringly obvious, yet rarely stated truths about the cause of this cancer … this TOTAL INSANITY, unwarranted/manufactured HATE which seems to be spreading throughout our country at a breakneck speed. THIS MUST STOP!

    The corruption, the propaganda, the LIES … has been going on so long, runs so deep & is SO EVIL, SO EXTREME & UNBELIEVABLE … I don’t think most Americans can wrap their brains around the truth, even those who think they are “objective, intelligent, logical or independent thinkers.” The brainwashing has gone on so damn long, and everyone considers themselves “too busy” to concern themselves with little things like … oh, I don’t know … a Muslim President who LIED about his religion, ADMITTED his birth cert was FORGED, yet FOR 8 FULL YEARS he was allowed to be our PRESIDENT – free range to tank our economy, risk our security, recklessly waste taxpayer dollars ($10M per YEAR that clown spent on PERSONAL FAMILY VACATIONS!).

    Don’t even get me started on Hillary (hint – multiple time felony criminal, suspected murderer, thief, embezzler, child AND drug trafficker, sociopath, woman-hating, rape enabling piece of human FILTH!). And NO I am not responsible for including links for all the lazy a-holes who believe they’re too entitled to do their own research. And NO I don’t believe everything on the internet, that’s why there’s this thing called “cross-checking.” Yep, it takes a little bit of time. But there are MOUNDS & MOUNDS of evidence, reliable witnesses, and stories which all point to the same ugly truths. Some obviously too ugly for lazy, entitled Americans to give up their shiny, artificial beliefs of what America has become, and who’s running the show.

    This “libtard/alt-right/neo-nazi” mudslinging shit-show has GOT TO STOP! We need more more loyal Americans and HONEST JOURNALISTS TO STEP FORWARD & OBJECTIVELY POINT OUT THE TRUTH ABOUT WHAT’S GOING ON.

    Anyone who knows ANYTHING about these globalist carnivores & the centuries of pychopathic, obsessive pursuit to own and dominate the global banking system & world economies, and thousands of people killed needlessly, as they funded BOTH SIDES of “manufactured wars” – for profit & population control. Almost every single war (if not all) were just games for these evil, twisted demons, who consider most every one of us – the entire human race – their pawns.

    Don’t believe me? Awesome. Do some research and prove me wrong. That would be a HUGE step in the right direction for America if people just did this, and shared what they found with friends & family.

    There is NO TIME LIKE TODAY. Unfortunately, we are running out of time here guys. Do the research & warn as many as you can … to NOT fall into these traps!

    NO RACISM, NO BIGOTRY, NO HATE CRIMES, NO INFIGHTING, NO USING THEIR INVENTED “GLOBALIST HATE LINGO!” AND BONUS POINTS for every one of these FILTHY COCKROACHES you can SMASH before they all start scattering to their multi-million dollar bunkers!

    OK done with rant & now stepping down Ioff soapbox. Free to loan anyone who’s willing & courageous enough to take some blows, in exchange for getting the truth to the masses before it’s too late. Not a ride at Disneyland, but then again, neither is what’s coming. Soon, VERY soon.

    • BamaGirl

      And PLEASE will everyone stop with the school teacher/grammar correction thing? Who gives a CRAP if someone misspells words? As long as original intention is clear, quit with the nitpicking PLEASE. This is what the shills are paid to do. In addition to mocking & belittling, they will poke at every “hole” they can find, including grammar and spelling.
      IF THIS HAPPENS TO YOU IGNORE IT, or call them out as the petty nitpicking shills they are.
      Damn, do I hate those traitor shills.
      WHY THE OBSESSION w/ IRRELEVANT DETAILS ie. spelling?
      Because they’re trained, they know w/emotional topics and/or when people are in a hurry (almost always), typos , errors etc are made. They jump on this like flies on shit, because being the filthy liars they are, it’s often their only arsenal.
      They try to shame – hoping to discredit truthers & scare off everyone else who WANTS to comment, but fear the same wrath.
      Even better – when you find these traitor pieces of trash doing this – point them out as much as possible. Most will immediately recognize a shill when called out. They use name calling, mocking & irrelevant crap to discredit. Like an 8-yr old on the playground. It’s just not immediately evident to people, especially those who are new to this madness. So we need to be relentless & point this out every single time we see it, to keep shitheads from dominating discussions with their irrelevant dribble.
      TRUTH SHALL PREVAIL!