Oilman Rex Tillerson and Ukraine

“Why should U.S. taxpayers be interested in Ukraine?” Secretary of State Rex Tillerson was heard, or overheard, to ask at a recent meeting of the Group of Seven foreign ministers. The remark sent the usually astute Anne Applebaum into medium dudgeon. Writing in the Washington Post, she commented, snidely: “Unlike everyone who has

By | 2017-04-28T21:28:15+00:00 April 26th, 2017|

How Trump’s First Three Months Point the Way to Three Percent Growth

The great nineteenth-century man of letters William Dean Howells once made a remark that I have long cherished as a sort of personal motto: “The problem for a critic,” Howells said, “is not making enemies, but keeping them.” A critic who does not make enemies is unlikely to be doing his job, inasmuch

By | 2017-04-27T01:34:15+00:00 April 22nd, 2017|

The Agony of Ann Coulter

Ann Coulter was one of the earliest and most outspoken supporters of Donald J. Trump. She stood by him during his earliest campaign “scandals” and brilliantly advocated for many of Trump’s positions. Though controversial, Coulter has been an ardent advocate of conservative principles over the years. What’s more, she has been one of

By | 2017-04-21T00:03:07+00:00 April 16th, 2017|

MOAB Makes Foreign Adventurism Less Likely Because Less Necessary

On Thursday, U.S. forces detonated the most powerful conventional weapon in the U.S. arsenal, the Massive Ordnance Air-burst Bomb or MOAB, against an ISIS tunnel complex in Afghanistan’s Nangahar Province which is just along that country’s northeast border with Pakistan. The MOAB first entered the US arsenal in 2003 during the lead up

By | 2017-04-21T00:04:06+00:00 April 14th, 2017|

The Grand Illusion: How Trump Tricked China and The Press

Well known film reviewer, Mike D’Angelo, writes, “Magic tricks frequently involve misdirection. In order to create an illusion, the magician needs to perform an action the audience shouldn’t see; this requires providing them [the audience] with something else on which they can focus.” Looking at the recent summit between President Donald J. Trump

By | 2017-04-21T00:01:18+00:00 April 13th, 2017|

Crime, the Gallows, and Trump

  In Henry Fielding’s novel Tom Jones, one Ensign Northerton quarrels with our hero and, without warning, deals him a seemingly mortal blow. Placed under arrest, the assailant begins to consider the consequences of his crime. Fielding writes that Northerton: had a great antipathy to those close winter quarters in the Castle of

By | 2017-04-21T00:01:19+00:00 April 13th, 2017|

Trump’s Realism: America First Not America Alone

Is Donald Trump a student of Charles Maurice de Talleyrand? Some of Trump’s recent actions suggest that he is, at least intuitively. I am thinking in particular of Talleyrand’s observation that “non-intervention is a metaphysical idea, indistinguishable in practice from intervention.” The question is not whether a state like America is part of the process.

By | 2017-04-13T00:32:34+00:00 April 10th, 2017|

Wars and Rumors of Wars

Earlier this week, Syrian strongman Bashar al-Assad ordered a Sarin gas attack on his purported enemies in the ongoing Syrian Civil War. This attack came on the heels of the Trump Administration signaling that it would be willing to live with the disgusting Assad regime, so long as the U.S. could destroy the Islamic

By | 2017-04-16T18:34:51+00:00 April 7th, 2017|

What’s In a Doctrine?

The Claremont Institute sponsored an event in Washington, D.C. a couple of weeks ago called “Conservatism in the Trump Era.” There, the speakers explained, in keeping with Plato’s Republic, “the foreign policy of a sensible nation is never devoted to the good of other nations, unless the good of another nation directly promotes the existence

By | 2017-04-03T05:32:04+00:00 March 25th, 2017|