Roger Kimball Wins the 2019 Bradley Prize

By | 2019-04-04T20:57:24-07:00 April 4th, 2019|
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Our friend Roger Kimball—editor and publisher of The New Criterion and Encounter Books, and a regular contributor to these pages—is one of three recipients of the prestigious 16th annual Bradley Prize.

The award “recognizes individuals whose outstanding achievements reflect The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation’s mission to restore, strengthen and protect the principles and institutions of American exceptionalism,” according to Thursday’s announcement.

It’s a big deal with a very nice stipend of $250,000. If you’ve read any of Kimball’s books and essays here or at the many other places he writes, you know he’s well-deserving of the honor.

The Bradley Prize ceremony is set for Tuesday, May 7, 2019, at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C.

Congratulations, Roger, and cheers!

Read the press release:

Milwaukee, WI – The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation announced today that Roger Kimball, the editor and publisher of The New Criterion and president and publisher of Encounter Books, is one of three winners of the 2019 Bradley Prizes. The honor recognizes individuals whose outstanding achievements reflect The Bradley Foundation’s mission to restore, strengthen and protect the principles and institutions of American exceptionalism. Kimball will receive the award at the 16th annual Bradley Prizes ceremony on Tuesday, May 7th at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C. 

“Roger’s commitment to advancing liberty and preserving democratic culture as an author, editor and publisher, is truly exceptional,” said Rick Graber, President and CEO of The Bradley Foundation. “The Bradley Foundation is proud to honor him for his remarkable contributions, which have informed important debate on art and intellectual life and have fostered the ideals of a free society.” 

Kimball is the author or editor of more than a dozen books, including the bestsellers Tenured Radicals: How Politics Has Corrupted Our Higher Education and The Long March: How the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s Changed America. A regular columnist for American Greatness, PJ Media, and the Spectator USA, he also contributes to many publications here and abroad, including The Wall Street Journal, National Review, Literary Review, and The New York Post. Kimball lectures widely and has appeared on many national radio and television programs as well as on the BBC. He has served on the Board of Advisors of the Gilder-Lehrman Institute of American History, the Board of Visitors and Governors of St. John’s College, Annapolis and Santa Fe, and Transaction Publishers. Kimball currently serves on the advisory board of Ralston College, the board of the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, and is chairman of the William F. Buckley Jr. Program at Yale. 

This year’s award winners were chosen by the Bradley Prizes Selection Committee, a group of notable leaders in various fields, after careful review of nearly 200 nominations. Each award carries a stipend of $250,000. 

About The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation: Founded in 1985, the Milwaukee-based Bradley Foundation supports projects and organizations that strengthen families and communities, inform and educate citizens, advance economic growth and encourage self-reliance. The Foundation’s approach to philanthropy is guided by four core principles: fidelity to the Constitution with its principles of limited government, federalism, separation of powers, and individual liberties; commitment to free markets; dedication to the formation of informed and capable citizens; and commitment to the institutions of civil society that cultivate individuals capable of self-governance. 

Photo credit: Marc Dimov/PMc via Getty Images

About the Author:

Ben Boychuk
Ben Boychuk is managing editor of American Greatness. He is a regular columnist for the Sacramento Bee, a former weekly syndicated columnist with Tribune Media, and a veteran of several publications, including Investor's Business Daily and the Claremont Review of Books. He lives in California.