Is Silicon Valley Trying to be the Deep State’s Enforcer?

By | 2017-02-20T22:31:33+00:00 February 20th, 2017|
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The Deep State is fomenting a coup. If it wasn’t apparent in the weeks leading up to Donald Trump’s inauguration last month that the entrenched network of D.C. bureaucrats, intelligence officials, and establishment press were working to undermine the new administration, the truth has become obvious in the past week.

#Resistance-sympathetic press outlets are continually and relentlessly pushing an anonymous leak-drive narrative meant to propel the legitimate occupant of the White House into impotence, obscurity, or resignation. It is a fact that has rightfully raised serious questions about the nature of constitutional government, and its capacity to coexist with an ever more intrusive and arrogant administrative state.

What is less obvious, or at least less remarked upon, is the extent to which the machinery enabling this coup is propped up by the #Resistance’s most prominent industry backers in Silicon Valley and the tech sector.

Indeed, the one thing that conclusively can be said about the loudest anti-Trump voices in the tech sector, aside from the fact that they also happen to be some of the most obnoxious and vocal progressives in the industry, is that they owe large amounts of their success to America’s intelligence apparatus.

And if you don’t believe that, don’t worry; there’s plenty of evidence at hand.

Start with Amazon, the brainchild of Jeff Bezos, who also happens to be the owner of one of the president’s most frequent press antagonists, the Washington Post. Back before liberals abandoned their principled critiques of the CIA in a fit of Trump Derangement Syndrome, the left-wing news site Alternet ran an article pointing out an obvious issue with Bezos’ stewardship of the Post. Namely, that he was neck deep in Deep State money. As Alternet wrote:

The Post’s new owner, Jeff Bezos, is the founder and CEO of Amazon—which recently landed a $600 million contract with the CIA. But the Post’s articles about the CIA are not disclosing that the newspaper’s sole owner is the main owner of CIA business partner Amazon.

Even for a multi-billionaire like Bezos, a $600 million contract is a big deal. That’s more than twice as much as Bezos paid to buy the Post four months ago.

Under other circumstances, one might feel inclined to pity the CIA, given the questionable track record of the cloud-based services that they paid Amazon to set up. However, in this case, schadenfreude is the best that patriots can manage.

Not to be outdone, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, another tech titan with disturbing ideas about the uses of political power and a low opinion of the resident, was outed around the same time for offering the NSA access to his social network, even going so far as to offer to set up “spying rooms,” or secure portals for spooks to enter the site with impunity.

Nor was Facebook alone in this: another tech giant, Google, was negotiating a similar deal. In fact, according to a post from investigative journalist Nafeez Ahmed on Medium, it’s arguable that the CIA made Google the powerhouse that it is, by (for instance) investing in the company through government-backed venture capital firms. Small coincidence, then, that Google has also emerged as a booster for President Trump’s eventual impeachment, despite its insincere public attempts to appear friendly to the new administration.

Of course, every firm is entitled to its own opinions about a politician. Opposition to a particular president’s agenda is not, by itself, evidence of any guilt or collusion. When it comes to these particular firms’ opposition to Trump, however, the size and quantity of deep state connections they enjoy raises serious questions about what exactly motivates that opposition, and more important, what they have within their power to do to further that opposition.

Consider this: Facebook, Google, and Amazon likely each possess information about every American citizen that, if they looked the other way at a few violations of privacy, could be used to damage or destroy people’s lives.

It is not a stretch to imagine, given each firm’s connections to the Deep State, that this information might already be in the hands of intelligence agencies across the board. Which means that, should they want to, tech companies like Facebook, Google, and Amazon could easily act as enforcers for the Deep State by handing dirt on political opponents straight to leakers, and also (in the case of Amazon’s Bezos) by offering them a sympathetic press outlet to publish that dirt. So long as the Deep State is willing to violate rules surrounding the leaking of information, this should frighten everyone who has ever had reason to be suspicious of policies favored by official Washington.

Therefore, Americans interested in constitutional government should gird themselves for a fight not merely over draining the swamp, but also the valley.

About the Author:

Mytheos Holt
Mytheos Holt is a senior fellow at the Institute for Liberty. He has held positions at the R Street Institute, Mair Strategies, TheBlaze, and National Review. He also worked as a speechwriter for U.S. Sen. John Barrasso, and reviews video games at Gamesided. He hails originally from Big Sur, California, but currently lives in Arlington, Virginia. Yes, Mytheos is his real name.