‘Bama Blowout Signals the End of the McConnell Era

By | 2017-06-02T18:30:05+00:00 September 27, 2017|
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Judge Roy Moore’s substantial defeat of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s handpicked, well-financed candidate, “Big Luther” Strange in the Alabama Republican Senate Primary is a political earthquake. It shows that the political and cultural tide that propelled Donald Trump past 16 primary opponents and Hillary Clinton into the White House is still running strong.

Two headlines from the New York Times explain why:

McConnell Scraps Vote on Latest GOP Healthcare Bill

and

Roy Moore Wins Senate GOP Runoff In Alabama

They present a near-perfect symmetry of cause and effect: McConnell’s brand of timid, ineffectual leadership, on the one hand, leads to a devastating electoral rebuke on the other. Voters served notice—again—that unprincipled, do-nothing Republicans who are more at home in opposition than in power are unneeded and unwanted.

And the Alabama race presented a clear picture of the battle for the soul—and control—of the Republican Party.

Under dubious circumstances, Luther Strange—a well-known ally of the Senate leadership—was appointed to fill the seat previously held by former Senator, now Attorney General Jeff Sessions. For a base Republican electorate already tired of business-as-usual politics, Strange was the avatar of everything wrong with their party: he’s a former Washington lobbyist who, as attorney general of Alabama, seemed to end a corruption investigation of the state’s governor just in time for that same governor appoint him to the U.S. Senate. When faced with questions from Alabama voters, he couldn’t seem to give direct answers to the important issues of the day, from immigration and national security to healthcare and tax reform. That simply confirmed voters’ suspicions that Strange lacked a discernible center of gravity.

And so he lost to the 70-year-old Judge Roy Moore, despite Trump’s endorsement and a raucous rally with the president on the Friday before the election. What’s more, Strange had oodles of money, led by $9 million from McConnell’s own Senate Majority Fund and millions from the Chamber of Commerce and other establishmentarian groups. In total, McConnell directed more than $30 million into the Alabama primary to defeat another Republican.

But why? Why would the Senate Leadership get so heavily involved in a primary in deep red Alabama? There is virtually no chance of the Senate losing that seat to a Democrat, no matter who the Republican candidate is.

The depth and breadth of the financial commitment are evidence of fear bordering on panic on the part of the Republican establishment. And that tells us two things: 1) McConnell and the Chamber of Commerce crowd are far more interested in defeating conservatives than they are in passing legislation that matches their campaign promises, and 2) they are poor stewards of other people’s money. Neither of these traits are desirable for political allies or for legislators overseeing the public fisc.

The biggest loser is Mitch McConnell, who should see that his days as majority leader are numbered. If history is any guide, McConnell will not go gently into that good night. The wrath of country club Republicans never burns so hotly nor are they ever so energetic as when they have base Republican voters in their sights. Democrats they can deal with, but a peasant voter uprising within their own ranks? That deserves a pogrom.

Still, it’s the people’s party and it’s easier to find new leadership than it is to find new voters. For the moment, the rank and file seem to have figured that out that they have the whip hand.

Trump reportedly went to bed Tuesday night, “embarrassed and pissed” at having been led into defeat by McConnell. Let this be a reminder to the president of how voters feel.

Perhaps sensing the change in the wind, incumbent Republican Bob Corker of Tennessee, one of the prime movers in the Senate behind Obama’s disastrous Iran deal, announced that he would not seek re-election. Other Senators who are notably out of step with the president and their own constituents may do that same or face defeat at the hands of emboldened challengers who believe in Trump’s populist, nationalist agenda.

Arizona’s Jeff Flake tops everyone’s list of endangered Republicans, but he is joined by Nevada’s Dean Heller and Mississippi’s Roger Wicker. In the House, there are many more.

The good news for Republicans is that Moore’s win will likely draw more and stronger candidates from the sidelines. Despite all the talk of Trump’s “cult of personality,” the 2016 election was about ideas—and ideas, as Richard Weaver famously observed, have consequences.

It is not lost on the public that congressional Republicans have failed to pass a single piece of significant legislation. The slow-motion debacle that has been the “fight” to repeal Obamacare is just the most prominent example of the leadership’s inability to legislate which is, after all, their one and only job.

The old Republican guard can’t persuade people. Why would anyone rally to McConnell? He doesn’t get anything done. Power not used is power lost. So what is the point of supporting a Majority Leader that doesn’t have the stomach to legislate?

While Trump will get to fulfill his pre-election promise to “campaign like hell” for Roy Moore now that he has won the primary, voters have seen that they can defeat the money and organization of the GOP establishment with an authentic candidate and a campaign based on common sense principles. Mitch McConnell should be considering another role in the Senate. The promise of the 2010 Tea Party election was postponed but not lost. That promise may be fulfilled by a rising generation of American nationalist candidates with the courage to govern.

As they come forward, voters need to ask them one defining question:

Will you vote for new leadership?

The drubbing McConnell and Co. took in Alabama proves that the Republican Party can become a republican party once again. The party’s future is one based on civic friendship and a political culture rooted in a strong, broad, and vibrant middle class. That’s the America of the founding. If we’re diligent—and a little bit lucky—that’s also the America of the future.

Content created by the Center for American Greatness, Inc. is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a significant audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact [email protected].

About the Author:

Chris Buskirk

Chris is the Publisher and Editor of American Greatness and the host of The Seth & Chris Show. He was a Publius Fellow at the Claremont Institute. and received a Fellowship from the Earhart Foundation. Chris is a serial entrepreneur who has built and sold businesses in financial services and digital marketing. He is a frequent guest on NPR’s Morning Edition. His writing has appeared in The Washington Post, The Hill, and elsewhere. Connect with Chris on Twitter at @TheChrisBuskirk

  • Good essay. I believe there is a typo, however: ‘The wrath of country club Republicans never burns so hotly nor are they ever so energetic as when they have base Republican voters in their site.’ should read ‘The wrath of country club Republicans never burns so hotly nor are they ever so energetic as when they have base Republican voters in their sights’.

    • ratchett3

      nobody proof-reads anymore, and it is INFURIATING.

    • Fixed. Thanks.

  • CaptSmith415

    I am so glad Trump was an early supporter of Judge Moore. I am so sick of winning!

    • Rich K

      Trump was conned by Bad Advice and now he is pissed . The Man does not like Losing.

      • CaptSmith415

        That our president is so easily conned by a “loser” like Mitch gives me great confidence.

        • Merrill Stubing

          How was he conned, exactly? He gave pretty tepid support to a guy that was obviously going to lose in order to keep the detente with McConnell, the MSM gets to have their daily hate with a few “OMG the DRUMPF lost bigly!” headlines (which is something they’ll do anyway, facts be damned) and in the end Trump has a true conservative in that seat. Yeah, he sure got tossed in the briar patch…

  • Doctor Bass Monkey

    Amen, brother

  • GrumpyGramps

    I think this is a good move, BUT, this won’t mean a thing if Conservatives sit at home in 2018 and don’t come out in droves to make this huge win count in Washington.

    • Rich K

      So that means I can count on your to show up at the polls too Brother???
      GOOD!!

      • GrumpyGramps

        I always vote. I don’t live in Alabama so I’ll be no help there, but I do vote in my state. What about you?

  • Bill S

    A sodomites-are-evil, no-I-won’t-move-my-Ten-Commandments loon like Moore will certainly win handily in Alabama but won’t exactly improve the image of the Republican party in more moderate parts of the country. You can’t really blame the party’s establishment for supporting the other guy.

    • Eric Ashley

      1. Sodomites are supporting old guys in little girl’s rooms. Evil or Evull?
      2. The SCOTUS not understanding the First Amendment is not Judge Moore’s problem.
      3. Lack of guts is not popular in pretty much any area of the country, which is why RINOs are hated.

      • Will

        especially 3

    • Optimus_Maximus

      Judge Moore took an oath to uphold the constitution. Not an oath to uphold “stare decisis”.

      Question: How can something held to be legal since the founding of the country, such as sodomy laws, display of the ten commandments, prayer in schools, etc. suddenly become unconstitutional, without amending the constitution and those amendments being ratified by a majority of the states?

      Answer: Judicial Oligarchy and the bastardization of the constitution by judicial fiat.

      Here’s hoping Judge Moore leads a republican Drive to impeach Federal Judges who have overstepped their limited constitutional interpretive role.

      MAGA! The

    • Merrill Stubing

      Thanks for the concern trolling, but I’ll take a conservative over a RINO any day of the week!

    • Phadras Johns

      Sorry Charlie you lost your “more moderate” part of the nation.
      The further the dems go left the closer they are to the edge of the political abyss.

  • Will

    “he lost to the 70-year-old Judge Roy Moore, despite Trump’s endorsement”
    Fox Butterfield is that you?

  • leoamery

    Time for the minority view:

    1. When Scalia lost his arrogant bet that he would outlive the Obama administration, who prevented Merrick Garland from going to the Supreme Court? One man: Mitch McConnell. no one else. (Clarence Thomas should have retired in May, and made way for another Gorsuch, but he too, thinks he can live forever.)
    2. Given that you are Majority Leader of a 52 seat majority, how effective in getting conservative i.e. more freedom, less govt, measures through would you be given also that you have these three as part of your majority:
    a)Susan Collins
    b)Jeff Flake and
    c) my God, John McCain

    I think it is possible to send McConnell packing, but if you do, who is your more effective replacement? If too many of the GOP squishes are primaried out, there’s a great danger of Majority Leader Schumer. If that happens Trump has two choices:

    a) hold fast and send up, say Bill Pryor. Schumer refuses to hold hearings, just as McConnell refused Garland a hearing. But Schumer can block the rest of Trump’s agenda. Can anyone guarantee that Trump wouldn’t talk to Schumer or Pelosi, trading his infrastructure agenda for a “moderate” i.e. a squish who would turn leftist in the manner of John Paul Stevens, Harry Blackmun. David Souter, and even John G. Roberts? Want to put some money that Trump would hold fast on his nominations, while the press and even his own people start calling him a “do nothing” President?
    b) Give up and make peace with Schumer/Pelosi. Trump will be the GOP nominee in 2020, and will need some accomplishments to run on. Up to possibly three “moderate” justices (for Ginsburg, Kennedy, and Breyer) and scrapping the voter fraud commission, and even coming out for the National Popular Vote Intersstate Compact, might seem a reasonable price to pay for an infrastructure program with plenty of ribbon cuttings.

    Who want to tell me the sure-fire way that these two possibilities can be avoided, while simultaneously ditching the GOP squishes?

    I don’t like these scenarios, but I can’t think of an effective counter to them short term. Long term, getting rid of vote fraud would help the conservative cause a great deal. But in the short term, conservatives have to work with the squishes. Or to put it another way, if “Down with McConnell!” then “Up with?” Give me a name for the up part.

    • Peter

      I am glad Judge Moore won, but unlike Paul Ryan I do not understand the hatred towards McConnell, who has a consistent conservative voting record and was one of the few to take a principled stand against McCain’s campaign finance reform. McConnell is no Jeff Flake.

      • Retired military

        He is just a ballless wonder who cant get shit done. Reid got 60 out of 60 votes for Obamacare. McConnell cant get 50 out of 52 (probably because he doesnt want to see Obamacare go away).

        • leoamery

          1. Oh. You don’t count the stopping of Merrick Garland, and the confirmation of Neil Gorsuch as “shit” that got done?

          2. OK, tell us how McConnell gets McCain to switch his vote. Tell us your “ballsy” strategy that will carry all before it.

          • Phadras Johns

            Johnny Mac ain’t long for this world scooter. And soon that backstabbing sob will get his just reward.

          • MidCali42

            McConnell could have told McCain he would be stripped of every leadership position…especially regarding the military. McCain would have folded. How do we know this? He is Senator Keating, right? McCain has proven bribery works on him.

          • tdvann

            Ditto for Murkowski and Collins.

          • leoamery

            Well:
            1/ McCain hold no “leadership positions..”
            2. His only committee chairmanship is the Armed Service Committee. If you think the Senate is going to sit still for McConnell stripping a committee chairman of his committee, then we disagree. Tell me the last time a Majority Leader took away a chairmanship absent a scandal.
            3. McCain was reelected in 2016. He can tell everyone to go to hell, and whaddaya gonna do about it, sucker?
            4. You say McCain can be bribed, but you don’t list any possible bribes, just threats. What can an 81 year old Senator, newly reelected, want as a bribe?

          • johnleehooker

            I’m betting on the tumor in a “head to head” match

          • libertyanyday

            not to meet his maker……….soon, but he is just one seat

          • MidCali42

            1) Good.
            2) Who cares? The mere fact he votes as a Democrat proves he doesn’t have taxpayers interest at heart, and doesnt care about Constitutional governancr. So, strip him. After all, what’s he going to do about it?
            3) Indeed, he was reelected with the promise to repeal Obamacare. However, it looks as though karma is setting things right by way of cancer. Given the prognosis, the AZ governor will soon be naming an actual Repiblican (hopefully!) to McCain’s former office.
            4) Based on his actions during the Keating S&L scandal, he apparently responds well to campaign cash. At least, that’s what the investigation displayed. He should have been thrown in jail a couple decades ago.

          • libertyanyday

            why do the 52 R’s NOT vote their conscience, they should be accountable for INDIVIDUAL votes.

          • MidCali42

            Remember, as politicians and lawyers, most of them lack consciences.

        • libertyanyday

          congress never votes away power or control.

      • Obey

        Mitch McConnell had a chance to fill dozens of judgeships for Trump during the summer recess and he did NOTHING

      • Patrice Couture

        I don’t think McConnell has been a consistent conservative. He is the face and voice of the establishment GOP which is much more concerned with big money backers than the voters. Remember when he said “we will repeal Obamacare on day 1” of President Trump’s term? And then 2 months later chastised the President for false expectations about the repeal of Obamacare.

      • Phadras Johns

        Because he is a gutless turtle?

      • MidCali42

        McConnell will always choose pork and a over taxpayers. McConnell will always choose more government over Comstitutional government. In short, McConnell is not conservative. He did one great thing with Garland…in, what, 30 years?

        • leoamery

          McConnell has only been Majority Leader since 2014. I’ll grant you freely that his record on pork is poor, and his small government record is worse. But until you can tell me the name of a better replacement who can hang onto a majority, you’ve only clapped a pistol to your own head and are yelling “Pull the trigger!”
          I don’t like the situation. But until the GOP can get more (and better) Senators in office, we’re stuck. Tell me the last time a third party was successful in this country. Or even another country: look at what happened to the UK Independence Party after Brexit.

          • Nancy

            UKIP got done what they originally set out to do.

          • MidCali42

            Doesnt matter. The Republican Party no longer serves taxpayers. They havent since Gingrich was forced out. What is the point of the GOP if they grow government, increase budgets, and chip away at the Bill of Rights? There is no point. GOP is dead as a party of limited government and freedom. McConnell is the poster child of that death.

      • tdvann

        Mainly because he can’t lead and can’t deliver. Sick and tired of hearing his excuses why he can’t get anything done. Only in Washington DC is failure success.

    • RJones

      This warning is legitimate. But, personally speaking, I’m more interested in rooting out fake republicans by any means, even if it means losing. The Dems can’t control their craziest elements and are adept at shooting their own toes off so we’ll deal with fallout. We cannot take our country back until we first take our party back.

      • leoamery

        “…I’m more interested in rooting out fake republicans by any means, even if it means losing.” Fair enough. Tell me what you are gong to do about the Supreme Court. Let Kennedy be replaced by a squish, and the country is in a hell of a mess, a mess that won’t be repaired easily if at all.

        • RJones

          The Obamacare vote showed that the SC is hardly the protector of anything. Besides replacing Kennedy by a similar lame brain maintains the status quo. If a lib goes, well there’ll be a fight and the seat may stay empty until the next election.

          • johnleehooker

            RBG is already dead, week end at Bernie’s on SCOTUS

      • bunky

        I think that’s a short sighted view.
        More “R”‘s, even if some are squishy, is better than not enough “R”‘s.

        • RJones

          That attitude, first articulated by WF Buckley, is what got us to today. We need new blood and new leaders who respect the voters and who care about the damage done to the country, most especially by corrupted officials, that happens under their watch.

          • bunky

            William F. Buckley, Jr., “Nominate the most conservative candidate who is electable.”
            I think 50% of an conservative agenda implemented is better than no conservative agenda implemented.

          • RJones

            If you’re ok with politicians who lie to you, who refuse to address corruption by members of the opposition, who support corrupt and highly and progressive opponents over your party’s candidate, who unleash special counsels to investigate nonsense claims of corruption by your party’s candidate, well….you might just be a democrat. You can get what you seem to want more quickly by voting for them. What’s the point of dragging it out?

          • bunky

            48 Republican US senators kept their promises.
            I don’t like the other four either.
            That doesn’t mean I’m going to vote for Democrats.
            You go ahead and keep waiting for the perfect Senator to vote for.

          • RJones

            Think we’re talking about many more than just four of them and we’re not just talking about Obamacare. There’s obviously no perfect candidate. But I have no problem, and assuming you’re a republican neither should you, in throwing out those who have proved they do not share our values. Yes, there’s risk in supporting less experienced candidates, but also the opposite, and you have to trust that your views are shared by the majority, which is something I do. happen to believe. In that case, any temporary setback is just…temporary. I admire and respect Buckley and all he accomplished for the country (his NR legacy notwithstanding). But on this issue he was just wrong, largely because integrity is the key requirement for faithful public service. Fake republicans lack that key attribute and therefore must be removed, regardless of any short term electoral cost.

          • bunky

            Name an issue that hasn’t been passed and I’ll show that the great majority supported it while a few caused us the headache.
            I’ll still not vote for a democrat.
            Primary and kick out the few bad apples? Hell yes, but not at the expense of the majority.

        • libertyanyday

          Volume doesnt make up for substance.

          • bunky

            If you don’t have the volume what gets done?

  • Deez Nuts

    All Republican’ts in Congress need to be shown to the exit.

  • Retired military

    “‘Bama Blowout Signals the End of the McConnell Era”

    Good riddance. Get rid of Mitch the Bitch McCuckold McConnell and his buds RINO Ryan, Maverick McCain, Clueless Collins , Lyndsey Grahamnesty and all the rest of worthless sacks.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/1fe1f40ea157e6f891f76709451c43fed3ed067b58bfd73255b7cc59afe13b6d.jpg

    • Billygoattincan

      Jeff Flake belongs in your corrupt RINO poster

      • tdvann

        Not for long, I bet he pulls out before the Primary.

        • Billygoattincan

          I wish you were right. Don’t underestimate the Business Roundtable and Chamber of Commerce coming to Flake’s rescue and outspending Kelli Ward in the AZ Senate primary 10 to 1 for Flake. Unlike Alabama, AZ voters are heavily Mormon (and Flake is the same)), and AZ voters (in this separate point, I am not referencing the influence of Mormonism here) have a history of idiotic choices for Senators (McCain’s 4 reelections is Exhibit A).

        • JustSomeGuy

          Doubt it.
          Senator World’s Worst Pilot didn’t see when it was time to quit, when the rocks on his ranch are younger than he is.
          Whyever would Flake do so, when his staff reassures him that Arizona loves loves LOVES him?

    • tdvann

      I must say I always called him Mush Mouth Mitch, but Mitch the Bitch sounds better.

  • Dano481971

    I think the news of McConnell’s political death are greatly exaggerated. This isn’t the first time a more conservative senate candidate has beaten an establishment choice, and yet McConnell is still the Senate Majority Leader.

    The base’s love and hate of McConnell swings back and forth. Just ten months ago, everyone was cheering how brilliant he was for saving Scalia’s seat on the Supreme Court.

    He can at times seem aloof, however he does well enough. Nobody could have made McCain, Paul, or Collins be reasonable in regards to the Obamacare repeal. He’s been better than Bill Frist was. So while some see McConnell as having one foot in the political grave, he persists.

    • Phadras Johns

      Wrong reading of the tea leaves friend. This is the end of the country club repub. May they rest in hell.

      • Felix

        This is NOT the end. It is only the beginning of the end.
        Underestimating our implacable foes and falling to complacency would be tragic.
        But I would agree, an end is in sight, even if a struggle still lies between us and it.

        • Billygoattincan

          Although it is unimaginable that Dems would take the Senate in 2018 (and the country and Trump would surely pay a yuge price), so be it. First, get rid of RINOs. We’re in it for the long game.

    • JP

      Most Leaders would have threatened McCain, Collins, and Murkowski with their Chairmanships. What did McConnell do, nothing.

      • Billygoattincan

        Right on. If Democrats were in the majority, Murkowski, Collins, McCain would be back-benchers by now stripped of any rank on any committee.

      • Anne Miller

        Most conservative Presidents would not have backed Luther Strange, a corrupt stooge. Trump did.

  • Phadras Johns

    Hear that Mitch? How about you Paul? Hear that bell ringing?
    That’s the death knell of the establishment repubs.
    Ask not for whom the bell tolls, gentlemen, it tolls for thee.
    Get ready to have your heads handed to you. You worthless, backstabbing, lying bastards.

  • JP

    This article is dead on. If anyone is buying that Trump was upset about Strange losing, they are just politically ignorant. We Conservatives are conducting a silent coup and we are in the early stages of a full blown war on the Establishment.

    • Felix

      Yes, only the early stages. The Deep State will not relinquish their stranglehold peacefully.
      Their resources and resolve will all be turned on us in coming elections, their existential threat.

  • Joel Mathis

    Congratulations on taking a bat to the knee of the Republican establishment. Quick question: To what end?

    Donald Trump appears too much the short-attention-span narcissist to accomplish much in office. Roy Moore, for all AmGreatness’s talk of “rule by the people” seems to prefer “rule by God.” In Alabama, the two may seem to overlap; that’s not the case everywhere.

    I guess the question is: You’re destroying the GOP mainstream. Fair enough. What’s next? Revolutions focused on destroying the old bad thing have a way of getting out of hand….

    • ProfElwood

      To what end? Hopefully, a smaller, more competent government. Is that guaranteed? Of course not! However, it’s certain that we WON’T get one with the establishment candidates.

      “rule by God”, meaning what? Is there a policy you have a problem with and would care to state explicitly, or do you just want to bash Christians? It’s a popular sport, mind you, but don’t stray into any other religion or alternative.

      Yes, revolutions often go badly. It’s a roll of the dice. Once in a while, it also goes well, and that’s the source of all progress in politics. You have to weigh the risk against the destruction of the status quo.

      • Joel Mathis

        Roy Moore has twice been booted from the Alabama Supreme Court because he decided his view of God’s wants superceded the law of the land. Seems fairly plain to me.

        As for the rest of your answer: Fair enough. Seems like a big risk to take given what you admit is a small chance of success, but I’m not really the audience for this stuff.

        • Billygoattincan

          Judge Moore was booted for corrupt liberal ideological reasons. Not anything shameful. You expect us deplorable morons not to know the difference?

          • Joel Mathis

            It’s pretty clear you don’t.

    • Bill Robbins

      Hi, Joel: McConnell, et. al. are no longer the Republican mainstream. The GOP abandoned its mainstream some time ago. What you take as “destroying the GOP mainstream” is actually destruction of the old, Uniparty order. Meanwhile, the mainstream has moved on. The Mainstream wants scalps, and scalps we shall have.

  • jacque tanner

    Getting rid of McDonnell is the best thing the republicans could do. It sure would make many Republicans happy and energized.

    • Billygoattincan

      McDonnell? hamburgers?

      • Peonie

        The people here are the sane ones. Respect.

  • Tom Johnson

    RINOs must go. Next election cycle, vote out John McCain, Mitch McConnell, Paul Ryan, Lisa Murkowski, Susan Collins.
    Boycott the NFL.
    Fight back!

    • JustSomeGuy

      Senator World’s Worst Pilot is going to be voted out by uncontrollable intracranial edema, courtesy of his glioblastoma. A pity, but: Not without its inevitable political benefits.

  • JDL

    Nothing has been more effective in flushing out all of the ‘Republicans’ in the senate than the health care debate. And while the Democrats are surging leftward, cries now go out to ride the GOP of RINO’s so that ‘true conservatives’ can be elected. Have the blacks in the NFL convinced whites that cops are bad? Have whites convinced blacks that cops are good?

    • Anne Miller

      Yes. It flushed out Donald Trump who viciously attacked the Freedom Caucus for trying to do what they promised there voters – real repeal Trump was doing a tag team with Paul Ryan and Mitch McConnell (just like in Alabama) attacking the true American constitutional solution. Obamacare repeal flushed out the phonies – Trump and McConnell and Portman and Collins and Ryan.

      • Steven Giles

        John McCain, Rand Paul, and Ted Cruz just refused to do anything to end Obamacare.

        • Anne Miller

          That is a pure lie. Rand Paul and Ted cruz both fought to get real repeal. Trump and his buddy McConnell didn’t let it even come to a vote. You are an ignoramus.

  • Anne Miller

    Yes, the movement that propelled Trump to victory is running so strong and so smart it defied Trump and embarrassed the hell out of him for being such a obvious tool of the Ruling Class. McConnell and Trump both were told to hit the road in Alabama. Good. Maybe the Cult will make a practice of ignoring Trump who mostly is all about himself . Still, the remnants of the Cult are explaining how this annihilation of the Trump backed stooge of McConnell is really an endorsement of Trump. Stupidity still rules the AlwaysTrumpers.

    • Steven Giles

      Who did Roy Moore heartily endorse? You and your brethren’s faulty reasoning and charming demeanor is why Cruzlims lose.

      • Anne Miller

        Who did Trump heartily endorse, you Jackass. He endorsed Strange and repeatedly said Moore could not win the general election. Another loony cult member.

  • Trapper John

    You may not like the McConnells of the world, but Roy Moore is crazier than a ****house rat. He basically prefers a theocracy.

    • 2+2=4andalwayswill

      Aaaaand …that’s how you get more Moore.

  • Billygoattincan

    Judge Moore is a true believer. So is Rand Paul. Although they may not agree on everything, we need more of them in the Senate. Time for primary opponents of 2018 RINO incumbents to come forward. Steve Bannon — get busy!!! MAGA!!!

    • SpeedMaster

      Please explain the difference between rejecting changes to obamaCare for “Conservative Purity” or for the reasons given by the other traitors.
      .
      THERE IS NONE!!!!!!!!!!!
      .
      You are being played. Simple as that.

      • Billygoattincan

        Rand Paul was not a holdout last time., and he would have flipped if his vote mattered. There were plenty of RINOs (McCain, Collins, and Murkowski) that would have killed the bill with or without Rand Paul.

        • SpeedMaster

          Rand Paul was not a holdout last time simply because he did not need to be. My premise is that a majority of the 52 R Senators are against the MAGA agenda and hide behind the votes of a select few. Voting records mean nothing.
          .
          Proof?
          .
          The Senate agreed unanimously to remain in “Informal” session throughout the last break. Reason? To prevent Trump from recess appointments.
          .
          Means ALL FIFTY TWO oppose the Trump agenda.

  • SpeedMaster

    The Republican Party caught the Globalism disease. It was fatal.

  • tdvann

    Loved the idiots who claimed this was a defeat for Trump. If any of the never-Trumpers had actually watched the rally for Luther Strange and the interviews with the attendees they would have noticed two very important points
    1) over 80% of the attendees interviewed said they were voting for Roy Moore but were there because they support Donald Trump.
    2) One of the biggest applause lines was when President Trump said he would support Roy Moore if he won the Primary.
    Trump’s support was obviously a favor for McConnell who may have promised that Graham-Cassidy would be passed. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that McConnell pulled the vote after Strange lost. I always said that I did not believe Donald Trump was a Conservative and may not even be a true Republican. So far however, the President has proven to be a far more reliable Conservative Republican than Mitch McConnell. I don’t believe the Republicans have anything to fear from the Democrats in 2018. I believe that most incumbent Republicans running wont make it out of the Primary. Just as NFL players are learning it is the height of stupidity to mistreat or lie to your customer base. The RINO establishment is so blinded by their hatred of Donald Trump that they can’t see they are rushing towards the slaughterhouse.

  • OkiefromMuskogee

    The 30 million dollars wasted was the desperate flailing of the “turtle” on his back trying to get upright….. next step, pull his head back into his shell of lobbyists and drinking buddies and hope he can survive but I suspect the rats running for the exits to become a stampede soon. (I know, mixing my metaphors but the point remains.)

  • jones66

    Well, I have already called my Senator’s (Cornyn & Cruz) offices and asked that they lead the effort to get rid of McConnell. Cornyn has the worst rating of any Texas US Senator since Reconstruction (Dems hate him because he is a Republi-cankicker and conservatives hate him because he is a coward) so I suggested that since he will not run again, he could improve his historical standing by leading the charge to get rid of The Turtle ! However, being a coward, I doubt we will see anything from him ! I wish I had the money I gave him years ago back !!!!

  • Old_Blue_64

    Many good points, and I agree that McConnell is finished. In the House, Paul Ryan has done his job (Lou Dobbs needs to wake up), passing health care reform, Dodd-Frank reform, and making real progress on tax reform. But everything dies in the Senate, thanks not so much to McConnell as it does to the handful of RINO’s who won’t vote for anything meaningful. They include McCain, Murkowski, Collins and several others.
    But the main question is who will replace McConnell? Is there anyone who, in a leadership position, can get the RINO’s to vote for something . . . indeed for anything? If so, I can’t imagine who that might be.

  • lawdog

    McConnell is just a weak leader. Senate democrats who may have supported some nominees and some legislation have admitted Schumer threatened them if they strayed. McConnell does not want to twist arms for votes, which is your main job as majority leader. He lets McCain, Murkowski, Paul, Flake, Sasse, Graham, Burr, Toomey and Collins do anything they want with zero punishment and they know it. Take away their committees, money, staff and threaten primary foes and every single one would cave, but he won’t because he wants to be everyone’s buddy and known some of them 30 years. Schumer knows how to wrangle people, McConnell refuses to which is why the Senate is failing in passing anything

  • docdave88

    My vote for President Trump on November 8, 2016 was, at least in part, my vote to drive a stake through the heart of the no-longer-relevant republicrat party.

    The name may survive, but the Republican Party is being remade and maybe, just maybe, we can have a truly conservative party now to offset the insanity of the demmerhoids.

  • JustSomeGuy

    Sad Mr Turtle is sad.
    Is he wearing his ‘angry’ face, or his ‘disappointed’ face, or his ‘baffled’ face in the attached photo?
    Hard to discern the subtle visual cues that separate them.

  • Gary731

    I am very please with Moore’s win in Alabama. I will also be very pleased when McCain is out of the Senate. He’s an anchor tied around the necks of the people.

  • NoDependsLoseElection

    I will drink champagne WHEN that loser Flake is booted…even if he loses to a Dem.
    Better an enemy on the other side than an enemy in my camp.
    As to McCain….I think his health will give the voters a break. He is disgusting, selfish arrogant filth…Never forget..he WAS the Keating Five (you kids, google it to see how sick this freak has always been…and hypocritical). He is to the GOP what the juiced up losers of the kneeling NFL are to football.
    Ryan better get tax reform through…or he can take his abs and bicep curls and taliban beard and go make cheese.
    We are SICK of these Republicrats and RINOS…enough is enough

  • Eric Johnson

    I do not share most Conservatives hatred for Mitch McConnell. I fully understand what poor Mitch has to work with, a Senate full of McCain’s and Sasse’s. Nothing more prima donnas who somehow think that they are all God’s gift to democratic government and have the backbone stiffness of a boiled noodle. All of those spoiled children he has to manage with both of his hands tied at all times.

    I a way I kind of feel bad for the old guy. No doubt McCain stabbed Mitch in the back just as hard, if not harder.

    • Kenny A

      The propaganda machine has fixed on McConnell faute de mieux. His is the face of Emmanuel Goldstein this season.

  • libertyanyday

    congress no longer works for americans, they have become , the defacto, us government since 2009. passsing the ada ‘ without reading it ‘, this lets the american voter know that their desires are unimportant . 535 complete fall in line lemmings more interested in getting re elected than to do their jobs

  • Rick Smith

    McConnell is and always has been an AMERICAN TRAITOR.
    What bothers me is Trump’s “principles” (or lack thereof).
    I think we can finally retire the imagery of the “White Knight”
    coming to the “District of Criminals” to “Drain the Swamp”.

    • Kenny A

      No, he’s only been an all-caps hair-on-fire “American traitor” for about a year. Before that, when he was swearing terrible oaths to make Obama a one-term president and frustrating his nominations, he was a doughty stalwart of the right.

  • putupjob

    i’m not quite there on “political earthquake”, an takes everyone by surprise.
    the ground has been rumbling for some time (remember cantor).

    this is the latest in a long sequence of loud and clear messages from the voting public that the gop slavemasters ignore.
    the slavemasters are entrenched and will continue lying and ruling.

  • Roy Moore is heads and shoulders better than most. If only he were truly conservative.* If only he were truly the Ten Commandment Judge.

    But, if elected, he’ll prove otherwise at his swearing in, when he lays his hand on a Bible and swears to uphold the biblically seditious Constitution as the supreme law of land.

    For evidence, see free online book “Bible Law vs. the United States Constitution: The Christian Perspective, in which every Article and Amendment is examined by the Bible, at http://www.bibleversusconstitution.org/BlvcOnline/blvc-index.html.

    Then find out how much you really know about the Constitution as compared to the Bible. Take our 10-question Constitution Survey in the right-hand sidebar and receive a complimentary copy of the 85-page “Primer” of the 565-page “BL vs. USC.”

    * See our blog article “Right, Left, and Center: Who Gets to Decide?” at http://www.constitutionmythbusters.org/right-left-and-center-who-gets-to-decide/.

  • GAdams

    CANTORize them all.

  • Peter63

    “As they [candidates] come forward, voters need to ask’ THEMSELVES ‘one defining question.’

    Is this candidate genuinely devoted to economic nationalism and populism and of such stern character, such Roman stoicism – ideally such devout Christian commitment – that they cannot be seduced by the wiles and big money of the Establishment/Wall Street/the Swamp’s lobby-industry?

    • Kenny A

      Devotion, stern character, saintly commitment. Your description is perfectly American, and perfectly explains why populists movements always fail in the America. You’re always lured into some messianic Fifth Monarchy fantasy, rather than accept a pragmatic assessment of power and human nature.

  • Peter63

    That something really massive has begun is proved not only by first Brexit, then President Trump’s election (I am referring to these events chronologically), now Judge Moore’s success in the Alabama primary, but – most of all – by AfD’s breakthrough in the German parliamentary election; and for this reason.-

    Through all the hundreds of years of Germany history of which mankind has a record, the Germans have distinguished themselves, in comparison with very many tribes and nations, by producing very little significant revolt against their rulers. The only two rebellions worth mentioning are the Peasants’ War of the 1520s and the Bomb Plot of July 1944. Both failed.

    Otherwise conformism to central-authority propaganda and diktat has been the constant habit in German states: unlike the countries in North and South America, unlike most European peoples, unlike many in Asia.

    For AfD now to have achieved the breakthrough from 0 to 94 seats in the Bundestag, last Sunday, tells us volumes about popular feeling and the oppugnancy against crony-corporatist globalisation &c. It has but just started and is going to be very big.

    For the Germans – of all people – to start saying ‘Enough already!’ to their overlords means we can now see matters with the clarity of Louis XVI’s prime minister. ‘Is this a revolt?’ asked the king. ‘No, Sire,’ came the reply: ‘It’s a revolution.’
    (Alternative für Deutschland [AfD]are explicitly and impenitently anti-Islam and anti mass immigration.)

  • Peonie

    If you are willing to face the fact that there isn’t a nickel’s worth of difference between the right and left at the highest levels of our government and that all of our elected officials are simply playing games to execute the establishment oligarch’s demands, everything becomes much clearer.

    • Kenny A

      Things would become clearer still after an elective lobotomy.

      • Peonie

        Truly superior people never feel the need to denigrate others.

  • Epaminondas

    The historic Republican party is a weird beast. One might almost describe it as being schizophrenic. It started off as a radical third party made up of abolitionist totalitarians, free soil German socialists (the “Forty-Eighters”), and a banking/industrialist class. Inevitably, the moneyed class won out and they were in no mood to string along with radicals and religious fanatics ad infinitum. Those unwanted elements made their way via the path of different political parties into the 20th century, eventually merging with Roosevelt’s Democratic party. Ever since, the GOP has pretty much handed off all social issues to this group, offering feeble opposition while complaining about taxes and regulations. Everyone has seen how this has played out since WWII…bigger and more tyrannical federal bureaucracies, with no end in sight. What pushed the white middle class over the edge was the Bush family’s fetish for open borders, while simultaneously outsourcing to China millions of industrial jobs. Enter Trump. There is no going back for the GOP. Whether it “reforms” itself, and I seriously doubt that the big money fueling it will go quietly, or whether it simply withers and becomes irrelevant, nothing is going to be the same going forward. Change had to come sooner or later. The left must be confronted in D.C., in the courts, and in the streets. If we cannot find GOP leadership to get the job done, then we’ll take the route of the early Republicans and form our own party from whatever segments of the American society who are equally enraged and estranged from the party and the government they control.

  • Schmutzli

    It is a mistake to ever refer to Rat McConnell as a “leader”. Even his official title has been changed to reflect the man – Rat McConnell, Senate Majority Liar.

    Paulie Boehner? Squealer of the House. After the Animal Farm propaganda pig.