Victor Davis Hanson

About Victor Davis Hanson

Victor Davis Hanson is an American military historian, columnist, former classics professor, and scholar of ancient warfare. He was a professor of classics at California State University, Fresno, and is currently the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution. He has been a visiting professor at Hillsdale College since 2004. Hanson was awarded the National Humanities Medal in 2007 by President George W. Bush. Hanson is also a farmer (growing raisin grapes on a family farm in Selma, California) and a critic of social trends related to farming and agrarianism. He is the author most recently of The Second World Wars – How the First Global Conflict was Fought and Won (Basic Books).

Will Unfinished Train Overpasses Become California’s Stonehenge?

Nobody quite knows who built Stonehenge some 5,000 years ago in southern England. The mysterious ring of huge stone monoliths stands mute. Californians may leave behind similarly enigmatic monuments for puzzled future generations. Along a 119-mile pathway in central California from Bakersfield to Madera, there are now huge, quarter-finished cement overpasses. These are

By | 2018-01-25T12:24:39+00:00 January 25th, 2018|

This is CNN . . . in 1945

What if something like CNN and modern communications were around in early 1945? What if the rules of presidential news coverage were then as they are now? And what if such a mythical CNN hated Franklin Delano Roosevelt as much as it despises Donald Trump, then as right-wing as it is now hard

By | 2018-01-16T11:14:29+00:00 January 15th, 2018|

Is Trump Really Crazy?

Michael Wolff’s sensational exposé of the supposed chaos of the Trump White House is no doubt largely a mix of fantasy, exaggeration, and some accidental truth. The postmodernist author even admits that his own methodologies defy verification, and so leave it up to the reader to distinguish his facts from fiction. Wolff’s theme

By | 2018-01-09T11:39:44+00:00 January 8th, 2018|

The View of the Blinkered

Sites like Vox, the Daily Beast, and the Weekly Standard have long praised the dossiers of Robert Mueller’s legal investigative team. The essays prove mostly the same. They often employ the same superlative nomenclature: “all-stars,” “dream-team,” “army,” and “professionals.” The hagiographies list the legal CVs of various lawyers and investigators now employed (usually

By | 2018-01-03T14:38:12+00:00 January 2nd, 2018|

Back to the Future: From Scooter Libby to Donald Trump

Do we remember today the media hysteria between 2003 and 2007 that surrounded the special counsel’s investigation, prosecution, and trial of Scooter Libby? During the progressive furor over the Iraq War, media-driven charges arose that Vice President Dick Cheney’s chief of staff, Lewis “Scooter” Libby, had deliberately leaked the covert status of Valerie

By | 2017-12-27T10:37:12+00:00 December 26th, 2017|

A Jacksonian Manifesto

Administrations by law must publish strategic manifestoes. Indeed, the Goldwater–Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of October 4, 1986 required every subsequent government to issue periodic and formal national strategic strategy blueprints. Most of these documents dating from the Reagan Administration are blah-blah boilerplate announcements of the obvious. They offer platitudinous promises of

By | 2017-12-19T09:39:08+00:00 December 18th, 2017|

Fake Truth

­The most effective way for the media to have refuted Donald Trump’s 24/7 accusations of “fake news” would have been to publish disinterested, factually based accounts of his presidency. The Trump record should have been set straight through logic and evidence. So one would think after a year of disseminating fake news aimed

By | 2017-12-12T09:57:59+00:00 December 11th, 2017|

Is a President’s Character His Presidency’s Destiny?

In the age of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, “character is destiny” sermons are now frequent. Clearly, a president who is “not a crook” or a philanderer is preferable to the alternative. But is that simple moral calculation sufficient when this one person can make the lives of 330 million at least somewhat

By | 2017-12-11T23:25:34+00:00 December 4th, 2017|

The Case for Sexual Deterrence

"Phaedra" (1880) by Alexandre Cabanel Just like aggressive nations, so too people who are not innately moral are deterred from committing crimes by fear of punishment. The likelihood of arrest, the good chance of conviction, the probability of jail time or fines, or a permanent criminal record—or all that and more—do

By | 2017-11-28T13:49:07+00:00 November 27th, 2017|