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Far-Left Riot Breaks out in Pennsylvania After Police Shooting of Man With Knife

The far-left terror groups Black Lives Matter and Antifa have found their latest target in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, following another police-involved shooting of a man who was being uncooperative with officers, which sparked more riots in the small town in southeastern Pennsylvania, as reported by Breitbart.

The riots broke following protests late at night against the police shooting of Ricardo Munoz, who was filmed by officers’ body cameras being uncooperative with police, ignoring their orders to comply and charging at an officer with a knife, which forced the officer to shoot him, killing him.

Despite the clear evidence that the shooting was justified, over 100 protesters gathered in the streets to protest the killing as another example of alleged “systemic racism” of America’s police. After police declared it an unlawful assembly, they attempted to disperse the protesters with tear gas. The rioters responded by damaging a police vehicle and throwing numerous objects, including bricks and glass bottles, at officers, eventually moving forward to smash several windows on the police precinct building.

The riots are the latest in a long line of violence since May, with several radical groups finding multiple excuses to cause destruction across America every time a minority is killed by police, even though such events are extremely rare and often justified. The riots first started after the drug-induced overdose death of George Floyd, a black man, in Minneapolis while in police custody; further riots flared up again after the police shot another black man, Jacob Blake, in Kenosha, Wisconsin as he was reaching for a knife hidden in his car to attack the officers, who were attempting to arrest him for an outstanding warrant on sexual assault charges.

The Lancaster riots, like the Kenosha riots, are further indication that the riots which originated in America’s biggest cities, from Minneapolis to Portland, have begun migrating to smaller towns in what is colloquially referred to as “Middle America,” such as Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, both of which are key swing states in the upcoming presidential election.