Elections

SOTU Clarifies the Choice in November

It boils down to a love for Americans and our liberty versus a lust for power and control over others.

Whether you like President Donald Trump or not, after his State of the Union address Tuesday night, this much appears true: His speech was an astonishing display of power and grace. 

Power, based on a list of accomplishments that seemed like it had no end, and grace, as it showed how he had delivered results as a president for all Americans—improving their lives no matter their race, gender, age, ethnicity or political party.

And it was all done in the face of a consciously planned series of coup activities that began before his election, escalated upon his inauguration, and are ongoing.

This is why Tuesday’s speech left me with the indelible impression of Trump as a no-B.S. CEO presenting an amazing stream of accomplishments at his annual shareholder meeting. 

Of course, this CEO did it in the face of dissident shareholders wearing white and proving themselves perfectly unwilling to acknowledge the success of the country or the people he honored. His speech crushed them by drawing explicit attention to the contrast between his factual accomplishments and their stubborn beliefs that already have or, if actually implemented, would only hurt Americans. That they could not applaud the things that turn out to have helped the people they claim to represent spoke volumes.

And what a Reaganesque closing about the greatness of America and Americans over the centuries! During which, the Democrats largely sat stone-faced. Perhaps that was even more telling. 

And when he was finished, what did Americans see? The speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, tore up her copy of the president’s speech. 

“Of all the things Trump has been criticized for—nothing, absolutely none of it comes close to being as shameless or classless as what Nancy Pelosi just did—ripping her copy of Trump’s speech in half moments after he finished his address,” a friend wrote. “An insult to all the people he just acknowledged, whose names and deeds are noted on that paper.”

As William B. Allen has said, you can’t love America if you don’t first love Americans. That difference—a love for Americans and our historical liberty versus a lust for power and control over others—sums up the ongoing turnaround choice before us in November, America.