Center for American Greatness

Undocumented and Afraid


- June 25th, 2019
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President Trump last week announced that starting at the end of June, “ICE will begin the process of removing the millions of illegal aliens who have illicitly found their way into the United States.”

“They will be removed as fast as they come in,” he said.

Administration officials said they would focus for now on the “more than 1 million illegal aliens who have been issued final deportation orders by federal judges yet remain at large in the country.”

But then the president walked back his announcement.

“At the request of Democrats, I have delayed the Illegal Immigration Removal Process (Deportation) for two weeks to see if the Democrats and Republicans can get together and work out a solution to the Asylum and Loophole problems at the Southern Border,” Trump said. “If not, Deportations start!”

Why wait? The president has the authority to enforce the law. Nevertheless, all we can do for now is to keep our eyes looking forward, hope Trump comes through, and bask in the light filtering in from the Overton window as it shifts.

It’s easy to see why criminals should be prioritized for removal. But those who say all illegal aliens are criminals, by definition, have a fair point, too. If that’s too much to ask, then violent criminals, certainly.

But there is another group, more toxic to the body politic than most: the haughty, self-described “Undocumented and Unafraid” clique. I mean the “undocumented” activists, organizers, and political operatives who have reaped the generosity of this country, only to spit in its face.

There is, to start, Lizbeth Mateo, an illegal alien appointed to state office in California. Her inaugural tweet was kindly directed at former Attorney General Jeff Sessions: “Fuck you @jeffsessions!! You coward piece of shit. You think this is going to change the resolve of these families? You don’t know the strength and courage of my community.”

As I have noted before, Mateo is not an American. She is a Mexican living in America. When she says, “my community,” she means the foreign nationals on behalf of whom she goes to war against Middle America. The New York Times has crowned her, as she undoubtedly fancies herself to be, “A Defender of the Constitution, With No Legal Right to Live Here”—and yet this human non-sequitur is a living, breathing affront to the rule of law.

Then there is Jonathan Jayes-Green. This “queer undocumented Afro-Panamanian” is the co-founder of the UndocuBlack Network, an organization that advocates for illegal aliens of the “Afro” persuasion. The Congolese and Angolan illegal aliens who have arrived through U.S.-Mexico border have, therefore, a network at their disposal managed by Jayes-Green. Naturally, this organization is committed “to the greater fight against white supremacy.”

Jayes-Green believes himself and his Pan-African community to be untouchable, a law unto themselves as it were. “We as undocumented people know we are powerful, resilient, and we are not going anywhere.” Perhaps the Trump Administration can look into checking that claim.

Last on this short list, but certainly not least, is Jose Antonio Vargas, a man who works tirelessly to subvert our laws and way of life as a militant advocate for illegal aliens. He has also taken up the sword against “white people,” to whom he—much like Mateo and Jayes-Green—owes what success and notoriety he has.

Were it not for a society organized around “white people” and “white privilege,” Vargas, Mateo, and Jayes-Green would be materially worse off and utterly boring. They are considered “brave” and “stunning” only because they are uninvited foreigners thumbing their noses at the generosity of the richest nation on earth. In their countries of origin, they would have had to conceive of identities and professions divorced from the ethnic activism that is so vogue  among their white liberal abettors. For whom would they perform their ethno-cultural dance? Who would pay and clap along in their native countries?

But this is all beside the point: they have to go back.

Targeting this group is not merely an act of petty schadenfreude. It serves a tactical purpose. First, their work aids other, less resourceful illegal aliens. Getting rid of them would make removing the rest easier.

More important, in war and politics, Clausewitz reminds us, “a certain center of gravity develops, the hub of all power and movement, on which everything depends. That is the point against which all our energies should be directed.” To remove illegal aliens like Mateo, Jayes-Green, and Vargas, then, would strike at the center of the open borders camp.

The influence of this group is the equivalent of soft power. In foreign affairs, “soft power” is the ability of a country to persuade others to do what it wants without force or coercion, primarily through economic and cultural influence.

Mateo sits on the California Student Opportunity and Access Program Project Grant Advisory Committee that supports efforts to increase college access for “poor students.” And in California, of course, that means illegal aliens. Mateo is frank about this fact, saying that “while undocumented students have become more visible in our state, they remain underrepresented in places where decisions that affect them are being made.”

Vargas has testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee as, a journalist for Time calls him, an “activist fighting for a path to citizenship for the nation’s 11 million undocumented Americans.” In fact, the number is closer to 22 million.

The impact of propagandists like Jayes-Green and other “undocumented” activists cannot be underestimated. Though Jayes-Green does not sit on a committee, his network is dedicated to “advocacy, local organizing, and cultivating strategic alliances to advance policies that affect” favorable outcomes for illegal aliens.

While they do not wield the sword of state, their activities supplement the coercive efforts of those who do and stand to benefit far more than “marginalized communities” by their activism.

The deportation of a million or so illegal aliens is a welcome development, though it is unclear just how many of that number will actually be captured and sent packing—or if it will happen at all. The removal of just one activist or operative, on the other hand, would go a long way toward the ultimate goal of ridding the United States of illegal aliens completely—which, if we are to “Make America Great Again,” is imperative.

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Photo Credit: Balogh David/EyeEm/Getty Images

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