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Senate Dems Quietly Delete Supreme Court Twitter Poll After Kavanaugh Routs Ginsberg

WASHINGTON, DC – JULY 09: U.S. Circuit Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh looks on as U.S. President Donald Trump introduces him as his nominee to the United States Supreme Court during an event in the East Room of the White House July 9, 2018 in Washington, DC. Pending confirmation by the U.S. Senate, Judge Kavanaugh would succeed Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy, 81, who is retiring after 30 years of service on the high court. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Senate Democrats stepped on a rake over the weekend when they decided to run a Twitter poll asking users if they preferred Supreme Court justices like 86-year-old leftist Ruth Bader Ginsburg or justices like 54-year old conservative Brett Kavanaugh.

It did not go well for them:

Journalist Yashar Ali asked the obvious question: “Who thought this was a good idea?” Because it’s never a good idea to pose a question like this on a public forum unless you’re damn sure of how it’s going to turn out.

Republican National Committee spokeswoman Elizabeth Harrington dunked on the DSCC for deleting their poll, tweeting that Democrats were “refusing to accept voting results (again).”

Other conservative Twitter users had some fun at the DSCC’s expense:

Another poll Senate Dems posted on Twitter last week started off on very shaky ground. The DSCC account asked its followers whether Special Counsel Robert Mueller should testify before Congress. A whopping 71 percent said no and only 29 percent said yes after over 2,200 votes.

It looks like a lot of right-wing Twitter users voted “no” just to mess with the Democrats.  It’s also possible that President Trump influenced the vote when he weighed in on the question with couple of tweets of his own on Sunday.

The poll tightened, however, on Monday with 52 percent of users voting “yes” and  48 percent voting “no.”

That result likely includes a lot of conservatives who would love to see Mueller face questions from Republicans like Reps Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) and John Ratcliffe (R-Texas) and Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.)

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)