The PMS Caucus

By | 2019-02-07T17:53:35-07:00 February 7th, 2019|
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In a gracious move at his State of the Union address, President Trump gave a shout-out to the historic number of women serving in Congress this year. “Exactly one century after Congress passed the constitutional amendment giving women the right to vote, we now have more women serving in Congress than at any time before,” the president said, pointing to a claque of congresswomen seated in front of him.

The female Democratic representatives, many dressed in white to honor the suffrage movement’s 100th anniversary, erupted with self-congratulatory glee. The same gals who were seen scowling, seething, and fake-crying just moments before suddenly were giddy, clapping wildly and high-fiving each other.

Say hello to the PMS Caucus.

Rather than demonstrate that women politicians on a combative national stage can govern in a sober and diplomatic way, female Democrats in Congress—don’t call them ladies—unfortunately are playing into the very stereotypes that they claim to want to disprove. They are moody, petulant, and impulsive. When confronted about their bad ideas or egregious remarks, these Cycle Sisters rage about sexism and racism rather than respond in good faith. They have profanity-laced temper tantrums and emotional breakdowns in public.

Their collective mood is so foul and unpredictable that one feels almost compelled to give them a box of chocolate donuts, a dose of Midol, and send them to bed with a heating pad.

The PMS Caucus showed their true colors on Tuesday night—and one of them wasn’t white. They were red and blue, and not in an American way. Their de facto leader, Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) glowered throughout the president’s speech. The youngest person ever to serve in the people’s house didn’t applaud when the president heralded a federal agent who rescued hundreds of women and girls from sex traffickers. She also refused to stand when First Lady Melania Trump was introduced; at the introduction of American war veterans; for record low unemployment among minorities; and for plans to eliminate the scourge of AIDS.

Her Cycle Sisters joined their leader in an extended public pout, rising only to cheer themselves. After the event, a giggly Ocasio-Cortez caught up with TMZ where she called the speech “weird” and oddly claimed that the president “trolled himself” when he celebrated the congresswomen. (The better argument is that Trump trolled them.) In a rambling post-SOTU interview on MSNBC, Ocasio-Cortez whined that Trump is an authoritarian and insisted he “didn’t do his homework” in preparation for his speech.

When Wall Street Journal columnist Peggy Noonan tweeted that Ocasio-Cortez had a “rare” bad night and conducted herself like a “sullen teenager,” the self-proclaimed tough girl from the Bronx took great umbrage. “We’re flying without a pilot,” she tweeted while linking to Noonan’s post. “And I’m not here to comfort anyone about that fact.”

Touchy.

Others acted just as badly this week. Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.), a newly-elected Democratic congresswoman from Minnesota, was caught on camera appearing to cry when Trump talked about the plight of illegal immigrants: Omar immigrated to the United States from Somalia when she was 8-years-old and is a naturalized American citizen.

After some called her out on social media for grieving the president’s rather tepid remarks, she posted a weird clip of her dancing: “When I hear individual 1 spout hate about immigrants,” she tweeted. (Prosecutors refer to President Trump in the Michael Cohen indictment as “Individual 1.”) Omar offered more post-speech analysis in a two-minute video where she scrutinized the president’s venerable guests. “It was a parade of American heroes that he sort of used to manipulate the American people,” she told the camera. “And I kinda felt bad for them, they should be celebrated, they shouldn’t be used to gain political points.” The heroes she claimed to pity were World War II veterans, Holocaust survivors, and astronaut Buzz Aldrin. That’s cute.

Not satisfied just to mock the elderly this week, Omar took a break from her Israel-bashing to pick on Christian teenage boys—again. When confronted by a reporter asking why she hasn’t apologized to the Covington Catholic High School students, who she accused of being racists in a since-deleted tweet, Omar explained her “message to them was in life there are consequences in the way you behave.”

Omar wasn’t the only Cycle Sister targeting teen boys after the president’s speech. Rep. Nydia Velazquez (D-N.Y.) threatened a young, black high schooler on Twitter because he didn’t know her name. “Hi @TheCJPearson, I’m not the woman sitting next to her,” Velazquez tweeted to Republican activist C.J. Pearson. “@AOC and I—and millions like us—are the future of this country. And you’re right to be afraid of us. But you should learn my name.”

Why do the women who claim to be the toughest always have the thinnest skin?

And it isn’t just the PMS Caucus on the House side that seems overly irritable and erratic. When freshman Senator Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) broke Cycle Sister protocol and stood to applaud the president, she quickly was admonished by her Democratic colleague. In a video clip that quickly went viral, Sen. Jacky Rosen (D-Nev.) rose to tell a clapping Sinema to “watch her ass.” Sinema, to her credit, ignored her.

Sen. Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii), who warned men to “sit down and shut up” during the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation fiasco, took her own advice Tuesday night, remaining both seated and silent while the gallery applauded a 10-year-old girl battling brain cancer. Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) rebutted suggestions that she was sleeping during the address. “I wasn’t sleeping,” Stabenow tweeted. “I was trying not to scream.”

It’s one thing to have really bad ideas, such as killing newborns, banning airplanes, and confiscating wealth. It’s another thing to have a bad attitude. If the PMS Caucus is serious about convincing Americans to go full socialist, they might want to behave a little bit better than moody women with unchecked hormonal imbalances.

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Photo credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images

About the Author:

Julie Kelly
Julie Kelly is a political commentator and senior contributor to American Greatness. Her past work can be found at The Federalist and National Review. She also has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, The Hill, Chicago Tribune, Forbes, and Genetic Literacy Project. After college graduation, she served as a policy and communications consultant for several Republican candidates and elected officials in suburban Chicago. She also volunteered for her local GOP organization. After staying home for more than 10 years to raise her two daughters, Julie began teaching cooking classes out of her home. She then started writing about food policy, agriculture, and biotechnology, as well as climate change and other scientific issues. She graduated from Eastern Illinois University in 1990 with a degree in communications and minor degrees in political science and journalism. Julie lives in suburban Chicago with her husband, two daughters, and (unfortunately) three dogs.