The Great Homeschooling Freakout

Home schooling is one of the few activities left in the Golden State that isn’t heavily regulated. Around 200,000 kids are schooled at home in California. Families need only file an annual affidavit with the state Department of Education and register as a private school.

Well, that’s way too easy for some people. The problem, as ever, is “lack of reasonable regulation” (because nobody ever wants the “unreasonable” kind). If only the Turpins had been subjected to regular inspections by qualified state agents, these crimes may never have occurred.

Oh, please.

Blaming home schooling for this atrocity is like blaming trenchcoats for the Columbine High School massacre in 1999 – which, in effect, is what the Denver School Board did. The two killers had worn dusters, so the board banned students from wearing long coats thereafter, as if that would have made a difference.

The Turpins registered their home as a private school. The Turpins abused their children in the privacy of their home. Therefore, let’s erode people’s privacy and call it “reasonable” and “accountability.”

Read the rest at the Sacramento Bee.

About Ben Boychuk

Ben Boychuk is managing editor of American Greatness. He is a former weekly syndicated columnist with Tribune Media, and a veteran of several publications, including City Journal, Investor's Business Daily, and the Claremont Review of Books. He lives in California.

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6 responses to “The Great Homeschooling Freakout

    • We all know shitlibs believe only shitlibs should be allowed to propagandize children.

      “What does it matter if three quarters of the world perish providing the remaining quarter is Communist!”
      – Lenin

    • Why? Why do you have a such a closed minded approach to other alternatives? Just because you went to PS doesn’t mean you have to embrace the closed minded, politically correct education received from there.

  • Two of my grandkids are being home schooled here in Florida. Both have exceeded their peers in a public school “education” (so-called; or maybe should be “day care”) and both are in college. G/daughter just turned 18; g/son is now 16. Older brother – at 27 – was also home schooled and holds a management position. None have spent one day in a public school building.

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