Why Trump’s U.N. Speech Was a Triumph

By | 2017-06-02T18:30:05+00:00 September 19, 2017|
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Donald Trump on Tuesday confirmed yet again why he is the most robust president since Ronald Reagan. Following up on his brilliant speeches before a joint session of Congress in February, his speech about combating Islamic terrorism before Arab leaders in Saudi Arabia, and his splendid defense of Western civilizational values in Warsaw a few months ago, Trump addressed the United Nations and articulated for the 150 delegates at that ostentatiously corrupt institution the signal lesson of successful international relations: that freedom within nations, and comity among them, is best served not by the effacement or attenuation of national sovereignty but its frank and manly embrace.

“Sovereignty,” indeed, was the master word of Trump’s address. The word and its cognates occur 21 times in the 4,300-word talk, centrally in conjunction with the core Trumpian ideal of “principled realism.”

“We are guided,” Trump explained, “by outcomes, not ideology. We have a policy of principled realism, rooted in shared goals, interests, and values.”

The United Nations has in recent decades become a poster child for bureaucratic despond: corrupt, wasteful, and inefficient. It has also evolved into a megaphone for anti-American, left-wing sentiment, often hiding behind utopian world-government rhetoric.

This development, Trump reminded his listeners, is a blunt betrayal of the noble aspirations that formed the United Nations in the aftermath of World War II. Trump quoted Harry Truman, who stressed that the success of the United Nations depended on the “independent strength of its members.” The United Nations was not created to subvert national sovereignty but to help guarantee it.

One of the most refreshing things about Trump’s address—it is characteristic of his speeches—was his frankness. At the U.N., this had a positive as well as a critical side. On the positive side, I found it a breath of fresh air to hear an American president celebrate the achievements of America.

“The United States of America,” Trump said, “has been among the greatest forces for good in the history of the world, and the greatest defenders of sovereignty, security, and prosperity for all.” This is the simple truth, but I do not recall hearing such sentiments from the White House in recent years.

On the critical side, Trump was equally forthright. He affirmed his intention to battle threats to sovereignty from “the Ukraine to the South China Sea.” He roundly castigated the handful of “depraved” rogue regimes that not only terrorize their own people but threaten world peace. They violate, he noted, every principle upon which the U.N. was founded. In one the speech’s two most memorable moments, he called out the deplorable regime of Kim Jong-un in North Korea. The patience of the United States, Trump noted, is great, but it is not infinite.

If North Korea persists in its policy of nuclear blackmail, Trump explained, the United States “will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea.” He continued: “Rocket Man is on a suicide mission for himself and for his regime.” I could almost hear tongues clucking at the New York Times and the Washington Post, as much for the contemptuous nickname as for the threat of military force. But I liked it, just as I liked his robust calling-a-spade-a-spade moment with respect to the criminal regime of Iran, one of the world’s most ostentatious enablers of terrorism.

But Trump’s comments about North Korea and Iran were not only a declaration of resolve. They were also a challenge to the United Nations, the forum in which rogue regimes like Iran and North Korea ought to be brought to heel. The United States would step up to the plate by itself if necessary. But, Trump said, it would be better if the United Nations address the outliers. “If the righteous many do not confront the wicked few,” Trump said in another memorable line, “then evil will triumph.”

There were several good lines in this spectacular address. I think my absolute favorite—even better than the “Rocket Man” comment—came in Trump’s discussion of the failed socialist state of Venezuela. A few years ago Leftists from Jeremy Corbyn to Barack Obama were salivating over Hugo Chavez and his socialist policies. What we’ve seen, as could have been predicted—as was predicted by some of us—is that country’s rapid descent into poverty and chaos. “The problem in Venezuela,” Trump said, “is not that socialism has been poorly implemented, but that socialism has been faithfully implemented.”

It is important to see Trump’s speech in the the broader context of utopian ambition generally. In a memorable passage at the beginning of The Critique of Pure Reason, Kant evokes a soaring dove that, “cleaving the air in her free flight,” feels the resistance of the wind and imagines that its flight “would be easier still in empty space.” It is a fond thought, of course, since absent that aeolian pressure that dove would simply plummet to the ground.

How regularly the friction of reality works that way: making possible our endeavors even as it circumscribes and limits their extent. And how often, like Kant’s dove, we are tempted to imagine that our freedoms would be grander and more extravagant absent the countervailing forces that make them possible.

It wasn’t so long ago that I had hopes that the Marxist-socialist rot—outside the insulated purlieus of humanities departments at Western universities, anyway—was on the fast track to oblivion. Has any “philosophy” ever been so graphically refuted by events (or by numbers of corpses)?

Such fantasies are as perennial as they are vain. They insinuate themselves everywhere in the economy of human desire, not least in our political arrangements. Noticing the imperfection of our societies, we may be tempted into thinking that the problem is with the limiting structures we have inherited. If only we could dispense with them, we might imagine, beating our wings, how much better things might be.

What a cunning, devilish word is “might.” For here as elsewhere, possibility is cheap. Scrap our current political accommodations and things might be better. Then again, they might be a whole lot worse. Vide the host of tyrannies inspired by that disciple of airy possibility, Jean-Jacques Rousseau. “Man was born free,” he declaimed, “but is everywhere in chains”: two startling untruths in a single famous utterance.

Rousseau was keen on “forcing men to be free,” but we had to wait until his followers Robespierre and Saint-Just to discover that freedom in this sense is often indistinguishable from what Robespierre chillingly called “virtue and its emanation, terror.”

Something similar can be said about that other acolyte of possibility, Karl Marx. How much misery have his theories underwritten, promising paradise but delivering tyranny, oppression, poverty, and death?

It wasn’t so long ago that I had hopes that the Marxist-socialist rot—outside the insulated purlieus of humanities departments at Western universities, anyway—was on the fast track to oblivion. Has any “philosophy” ever been so graphically refuted by events (or by numbers of corpses)?

Maybe not, but refutation plays a much more modest role in human affairs than we might imagine. In fact, the socialist-inspired utopian chorus is alive and well, playing to full houses at an anti-democratic redoubt near you.

Consider the apparently unkillable dream of “world government.” It is as fatuous now as it was when H. G. Wells infused it with literary drama towards the beginning of the last century.

Confusing national loyalty with nationalism, many utopians argue that the former is a threat to peace. After all, wasn’t it national loyalty that sparked two world wars?

No, it was that perverted offspring, nationalism, which was defeated at great cost only by the successful mobilization of national loyalty. 

Every human child needs to learn to walk by himself; so, it seems, every generation needs to wean itself from the blandishments of various utopian schemes. In 2005, the political philosopher Jeremy Rabkin published a fine book called Law Without Nations? Why Constitutional Government Requires Sovereign States. Rabkin ably fleshed out the promise of his subtitle, but it would be folly to think this labor will not have to be repeated.

The temptation to exchange hard-won democratic freedom for the swaddling comfort of one or another central planning body is as inextinguishable as it is dangerous. As the English philosopher Roger Scruton argued, “Democracies owe their existence to national loyalties—the loyalties that are supposedly shared by government and opposition.” Confusing national loyalty with nationalism, many utopians argue that the former is a threat to peace. After all, wasn’t it national loyalty that sparked two world wars?

No, it was that perverted offspring, nationalism, which was defeated at great cost only by the successful mobilization of national loyalty. Scruton quotes Chesterton on this point: to condemn patriotism because people go to war for patriotic reasons, he said, is like condemning love because some loves lead to murder.

It is one of the great mysteries—or perhaps I should say it is one of the reliable reminders of human imperfection—that higher education often fosters a particular form of political stupidity. Scruton anatomizes that stupidity, noting “the educated derision that has been directed at our national loyalty by those whose freedom to criticize would have been extinguished years ago, had the English not been prepared to die for their country.” This peculiar mental deformation, Scruton observes, involves “the repudiation of inheritance and home.” It is a stage, he writes,

through which the adolescent mind normally passes. But it is a stage in which intellectuals tend to become arrested. As George Orwell pointed out, intellectuals on the Left are especially prone to it, and this has often made them willing agents of foreign powers. The Cambridge spies [Guy Burgess, Kim Philby, et al.] offer a telling illustration of what [this tendency] has meant for our country.

It is also telling that this déformation professionelle of intellectuals encourages them to repudiate patriotism as an atavistic passion and favor transnational institutions over national governments, rule by committee or the courts over democratic rule. Rabkin reminds us of the naïveté—what others have called “idealism”—that this preference requires. In order to believe that international bodies will protect human rights, for example, you would have to believe

that governments readily cooperate with other governments on common projects, even when such cooperation promises no direct exchange of benefits to each side. In the end, you must believe that human beings cooperate easily and naturally without much constraint—without much actual enforcement, hence without much need for force.

To believe this you must believe that almost all human beings are well-meaning, even to strangers. And you must believe that human beings have no very serious disagreements on fundamental matters.

The persistence of such beliefs is no guide to their cogency or truth. What that other Jeremy, Jeremy Bentham, long ago called “nonsense on stilts” presents a spectacle that is perhaps unsteady but nonetheless mesmerizing. And when it comes to the erosion of the nation state and its gradual replacement by unaccountable, transnational entities such as the EU, the UN, or the so-called “World Court,” the results are ominous. As Andrew C. McCarthy has noted,

[w]ith the potent combination of a seismic shift in public attitudes away from democratic self-determination and toward oligarchic juristocracy (or rule by courts), as well as a sweeping infrastructure of so-called “international human rights law,” this movement is now poised to realize much of its goal: A world in which the nation state, the organizing geopolitical paradigm and engine of human progress since the Treaty of Westphalia, substantially gives way to a post-sovereign order of global governance led by supra-national tribunals (or tribunals that, though nominally “national,” pledge fealty to the higher calling of “humanity”). Like other utopian projects, the end of this one is tyranny.

Today, the nation state, that territorially based network of filiation bound together through shared history, custom, law, and language, is under greater siege than at any time since the dissolution of the Roman Empire. The external threat of radical Islam—pardon the pleonasm—may be the greatest threat to Western civilization since 1571 when the Battle of Lepanto checked the incursion of what we used to call the paynim foe into Europe.

But in the end, perhaps the greatest threat to the West lies not in its external enemies, no matter how hostile or numerous, but in its inner uncertainty—an uncertainty that is all-too-often celebrated as an especially enlightened form of subtlety and sophistication—about who we are.

The attack on the nation state—a less orotund formulation might say our unwitting self-demolition—proceeds apace on several fronts. The world will soon recognize the great service Donald Trump has done for the forces of civilization through his eloquent and impassioned defense of national sovereignty.

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About the Author:

Roger Kimball
Roger Kimball is Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion and President and Publisher of Encounter Books. Mr. Kimball lectures widely and has appeared on national radio and television programs as well as the BBC. He is represented by Writers' Representatives, who can provide details about booking him. Mr. Kimball's latest book is The Fortunes of Permanence: Culture and Anarchy in an Age of Amnesia (St. Augustine's Press, 2012). He is also the author of The Rape of the Masters (Encounter), Lives of the Mind: The Use and Abuse of Intelligence from Hegel to Wodehouse (Ivan R. Dee), and Art's Prospect: The Challenge of Tradition in an Age of Celebrity (Ivan R. Dee). Other titles by Mr. Kimball include The Long March: How the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s Changed America (Encounter) and Experiments Against Reality: The Fate of Culture in the Postmodern Age (Ivan R. Dee). Mr. Kimball is also the author ofTenured Radicals: How Politics Has Corrupted Our Higher Education (HarperCollins). A new edition of Tenured Radicals, revised and expanded, was published by Ivan R. Dee in 2008. Mr. Kimball is a frequent contributor to many publications here and in England, including The New Criterion, The Times Literary Supplement, Modern Painters, Literary Review, The Wall Street Journal, The Public Interest, Commentary, The Spectator, The New York Times Book Review, The Sunday Telegraph, The American Spectator, The Weekly Standard, National Review, and The National Interest.
  • Not Chicken Little

    In so many ways, Trump is like a fresh, cool breeze blowing away the fetid miasma and malarial vapors of The Swamp and its stinky, putrid denizens. We need to elect more non-politicians!

    • Gene smiley

      1000 Thumbs up!

    • raffishtenant

      The Atlantic just published a non-exhaustive rundown of the many ways in which, far from draining The Swamp, Trump has been gleefully populating it with a whole new menagerie of loathsome creatures whose shenanigans would no doubt inspire unmitigated outrage from AG’s readers if they occurred in a Democratic administration. Not that anyone here reads The Atlantic, but the historical record will reflect the vast corruption of the Trump cabal all the same.

      • Not Chicken Little

        The Atlantic has not published any pro-Republican or pro-conservative articles for probably about 600 years. That you cite them as a credible source says all we need to know.

        We know the loathsome creatures appointed under Obama have worked to undermine America for the last 8 years, and many are still doing so. At least Trump, unlike Obama, loves America and is trying to appoint people who do the same.

        • raffishtenant

          I don’t discount verifiable facts that are inconvenient to my politics simply because they’re reported in AG, or elsewhere in the conservative media, which I read almost every day. My point stands: if Hillary or Obama were in office today, engaging in cynical cronyism to the extent that Trump is, you’d be having a cow. And rightfully so. But that little (R) by Trump’s name is all it takes to make most Republicans (and even a few actual conservatives) overlook and/or rationalize the extreme shadiness that’s right under their noses.

          Not that I have a problem with this, as it will make them that much less credible themselves in the future as commentators on what good government should look like.

    • See Hell…Van Horn(e)

      NoT ‘Chicken LiTTle, raTheR, The LiTTle ReD HeN!…’

      TRUMPIFY TRUMPIFICATIONS aLL aBOARD!…The TRUMP TRUMP TRUMP TraiN…We’LL be PaSSinG Oe’r that SwAmP & aLL ThAm SwAmP ThAnGszzz~!

  • yourmamatoo

    Our president did us proud again today.

    • R J Ault

      You, maybe. Not us!

      • Ronald Wright

        Crooked Hitlery LOST. Get over it! We had to tolerate 8 years of OdumbAss, who did NOTHING for America but run us down on the International scene; no country trusted this turd because he never told the truth and always backed off of what he said.he would do. He only loved the Muslim countries because he is STILL a Muslim at heart. He is also NOT our first Black anything; he is a MULATTO, mixed race. WHITE and BLACK.. The only thing really BLACK about him is the color of his skin and his heart.. Good riddance to bad rubbish.

        • R J Ault

          Ronald, please save your racist ranting for your local Klan cross Burnings. I am a firm believer in free speech but ignorant racist dumb asses like you test my convictions. Also, why the “Mulatto” rantings? Probably deep seeded sexual fears.

          • mcffoster

            You liberal leftists certainly have a difficult hearing and swallowing the truth, don’t you? You’re happy as long as you’re spending someone’s hard earned money other than your own. You may not like the term but, like it or nor, Obama is a “half-breed”. That’s just a fact even you can’t disprove. Ronald Wright’s article is spot on whether you like it or not – it’s past time to stop being politically correct and just be correct – I admit, even though you won’t, the TRUTH does hurt.

          • R J Ault

            “Halfbreed”. Unbelievable. You certainly wear your racism on your sleeve. And I’m a Reagan Republican! H

          • Gerald Flanders

            Talk about name calling. You sure have some issues you need to have looked at by a professional.

          • stopht

            as a racist you offend me

          • HighInformationVoter

            Keep calling people racist and deplorable. You do not understand politics 101. Politics is a game of addition, not division. You keep shrinking the people who will work with you, and unless you guys have guns (LOL) I don’t see you coming to power any time soon by screaming “RACIST!” at everyone who disagrees with you.

          • arley_barley

            Perhaps, the only thing that test your convictions is your insanity?? You rant wonderfully. AMEN

      • yourmamatoo

        Yes US!
        Try keeping up.

      • Historybuff

        The trumper cultists and russian trolls will never admit that trump is a disaster. The cultists because they have to have somebody to tell them what to believe and do… and the russian trolls because they know the trump cultists are dividing & destroying America.

        Like Rome… America will fall from internal rot within… not from external enemies.
        HB

        • R J Ault

          Gosh. Someone on this site with good sense!

  • acidulous

    Socialism will never die because it provides the perfect cover for those who wish to steal from others and get away with it. Socialists are dupes, thieves, and sadists.

    • Del_Varner

      Yes, indeed, why does Hugo Chavez’s daughter have a personal wealth of some 4 Billion dollars? Where did that come from? Why isn’t it being seized to buy food for all of those poor peasants?

      • GlennPMorris

        That’s a lot of “cake”

      • John33

        Or why does Kim Jong Un dine on delicacies from around the world while his people starve? Why during the great famine in the 90’s in North Korea, did we find out The Kim family was frequenting Disneyland? It’s the lie of “social equality” which really means “give the state all your stuff so the top of the pile can live lavishly”.

  • roastytoasty

    From “Explaining Postmodernism…” by Stephen R.C. Hicks:
    “[Immanuel] Kant’s contemporary Moses Mendelssohn was thus prescient in identifying Kant as “the all-destroyer.” Kant did not take all of the steps down to postmodernism, but he did take the decisive one. Of the five major features of Enlightenment reason–objectivity, competence, autonomy, universality, and being an individual faculty–Kant rejects objectivity. Once reason is so severed from reality, the rest is details–details that are worked out over the next two centuries. By the time we get to the postmodernist account, reason is seen as not only subjective, but also as incompetent, highly contingent, relative and collective. Between Kant and the postmodernists comes the successive abandonment of the rest of reason’s features.”
    https://www.amazon.com/Explaining-Postmodernism-Skepticism-Socialism-Rousseau/dp/0983258406

    • GlennPMorris

      The minds of the jihadists and the post-modernists are the core existential threats we face to Western Civilization.

      Not accepting that they will always be there… I call it the “hobbling effect” on why they persist .

  • John Willson

    From his magnificent inaugural address through today at the UN, President Trump’s formal addresses have been those of a true patriot, loving America First.

  • Anne Miller

    Speeches are “swell”. Tougher are real freedom defending political actions. Like working to repeal Obamacare. Like defending the rule of law and refusing the DREAMER lie that they are entitled to live here, vote here and get free stuff here. Harder than a speech is submitting a budget that only pays for federal costs that are Constitutional and ends all the federal overreach that is not. Harder than a speech is fighting the real socialism in America with a direct assault on the Ruling Class, in the form of Mitch McConnell and doing everything possible to help Judge Roy Moore beat Luther Strange and become Senator from Alabama. This would start to turn the tide against the corporate thug ownership of the Republican Party and maybe e give freedom and the Constitution a fighting chance against the American versions of Chavez and the mullahs.

    Speeches are fun. Trump showed he loves them when he had his campaign rallies. Delivering on promises made in grand speeches is harder. A speech can be just a pack of lies if actions don’t match the words.

    • SDN

      Ah, the ignorant of civics troll shows up here too.

      “Separation of powers”, what a concept. Congressional action is required for everything you list, except for campaigning for Strange. Since that didn’t appear in your earliest posts, one can only suppose you realized the rake you stepped on.

      • Anne Miller

        You are a Jackass. The President is the leader of the party. He controls the party apparatus. He has the bully pulpit. I don’t remember Trump saying how he would report to McConnell and Ryan when he was bragging how he was the only man in America who could fix everything, By the way, Jackass, how will Luther Strange help? Trump wants more McConnell puppets.

        • creatureofhabit

          Trump controls the Republican party apparatus? Really? When did that magnificent event occur?

    • Your cheque is in the mail.

      • Anne Miller

        Thank you. I need a cheque. You could also send me a check.

    • CapitalistRoader

      This would start to turn the tide against the corporate thug ownership of the Republican Party…

      Pot, meet kettle:

      “Barack Obama To Make $1.2 Million From Wall Street Speeches…between 2013 and 2015, Hillary Clinton gave 92 speeches to banks and other financial service organizations and earned $21.6 million in just two years.”

      http://i0.wp.com/farm4.static.flickr.com/3056/2983236034_456efe452c_o.jpg?w=300

      • Anne Miller

        Try to make sense with your comment. Can you do that?

        • steveH01

          Why should anyone else, you don’t.

        • CapitalistRoader

          Poor little Anne. Her girl Felonia von Pantsuit got shot down in November and now Anne’s got the vapors.

          Break out the smelling salts!

      • AndRebecca

        You mean Soros owns the Republican Party, like the Democratic Party? Goldman Sachs gives their money to the Dems, along with Soros. Only McCain and a few others are NWO guys.

  • BillHarry

    Excellent article. Thank you

  • Sir Walter Really

    Watching this half-wit stumble through a speech he couldn’t bother to pre-read was just another in a long line of embarrassments from this incompetent administration. Kelley’s face said it all. Can’t wait ’til Orange Julius and his corrupt band of grifters are all in jail.

    • Raptor Jesus

      Seek professional psychiatric care immediately. You are certifiable.

      • Sir Walter Really

        There’s nobody dumber, more hypocritical, or more confused than a ‘Christian’ who supports Trump.

        • ReasonedVoice

          “There’s nobody dumber, more hypocritical, or more confused than a ‘Christian’ who supports Trump.”
          On the contrary, there certainly is. That would be a ‘Christian’ that supports the Democrat Party and their commitment to taxpayer-funded abortion-on-demand, including partial-birth abortion. You know, where the baby is killed moments before it is born, or even during birth.

          • Scott Wunder

            There’s nobody dumber, more hypocritical, or more confused than a Christian.
            Fixed it for both of you.

      • R J Ault

        Actually, nobody is certifiable in this debate but if you don’t understand that we have elected an incompetent, lazy, none-to-bright, serial sexual predator, and likely Russian agent, then you’re just massively deluded and have fallen for the con job of the millenium.

        • AndRebecca

          You have your presidents mixed up. Bill Clinton is a serial predator, and Obama a likely Russian agent, and Trump is more intelligent than either of the two and you have to be stupid to think he is lazy.

          • R J Ault

            Lazy isn’t the half of it. This clown has never done a honest days work in his life. He has done a lot of dishonest work conning people. You might not realize it, but to be called stupid by a deluded Trumpkin fool is a badge of honor. We’ll have the last laugh when he is impeached and removed from office for a list of crimes too numerous to mention here.

          • AndRebecca

            You really need some info on Trump. Wikipedia has a great article on him. He has been working since a child…and has a great education, which he worked hard for. I’ve seen you deluded leftists go for your “badge of honor” when dissing Trump. Love your vagina hats…Crazy is the new normal.

    • JB

      Yea, I’m sure you have all the answers, huh?
      We have had enough presidents who only say what they think the world wants to hear not what it NEEDS to hear. Like telling a child no more sweets before bedtime, those who would do us harm need to know that we will respond with great force to any threat to our families and our homes. Time to quit calling appeasement negotiating.
      Grow up.

      • Sir Walter Really

        That’s a cute analogy, but the truth is you support a man who has no principles or integrity, is massively under qualified, and tells lies on a daily basis. He is corrupt and dishonest and craps on the Constitution constantly. He has the temperament and attention span of a 3 year old and has made us a laughingstock on the world stage. I can’t wait for the day when he is impeached and hopefully put in jail.

        • R J Ault

          Sir Walter! You da man – tell it like is is!

        • Raptor Jesus

          You belong in a mental institution.

        • HighInformationVoter

          You were already a laughingstock for delivering billions in cash to Iran under cover of darkness. LOl

          • Dave781

            Interesting that you would refer to the USA as “you.” What country are YOU from?

          • HighInformationVoter

            I was referring to Liberal Democrats.

      • R J Ault

        The growing up need to be done by the poor souls who fell for the Great Yam’s Con Job.

    • bilahn

      At least someone has a brain Sir Walter. The support for this disgusting POTUS is absolutely appalling and shocking. Never a criticism of Russia tho. I wonder why>

      • Sir Walter Really

        So true. All these idiots disconnected from reality who give him a pass because they think he’ll get rid of those awful brown people or give them back all their taxes or who knows what. And the worst are these evangelicals who purposely overlook that he epitomizes 6 of the 7 deadly sins.

  • msher_1

    Of course most headlines were “Trump threatens to destroy North Korea.”

    • Cybergeezer

      And, insults nation states and their diplomats.
      He should have pee’d on their podium before he left.

  • Bill Robbins

    No one at the UN cares about what Trump had to say. Too busy with cocktail parties and the continued roll-out of the New World Order and Sharia Law.

    • Californiasailor

      I do agree with your point, Bill. My sister states the same. She wont come in here because she will lose it and open her dirty mouth and let them all have it….

  • Itche-Meir

    Triumph in the sense that it didn’t offend our enemies any more than it disgusted our allies

    • HighInformationVoter

      What good are allies who don’t believe in national sovereignty?

  • bilahn

    The one scoundrel Trump letftout of his speech was himself. He is no person to be criticizing anyone as he is a corrupt disgusting scoundrel, if not outright criminal. And I sure Obama was wiretapping him – why wouldn’t he feel it necessary to root out an evil like Trump before our country is ruined.

    • odys

      Wouldn’t being corrupt imply he is criminal? I suggest you buy a dictionary.

    • Ronald Wright

      OdumbAss BROKE THE LAW. Numerous times and “Congress” let him get away with it. HIs DACA program was ILLEGAL. He lied to America about OdumbAss Care; you can keep your doctor, prices will drop etc. etc. Lie after lie after lie.. OdumbAss should be brought up on criminal charges, just like Crooked Hillary and Comey and all the rest that have BROKEN THE LAW..

  • LeighB

    This article should be required reading. Excellent, thought-provoking and wise.

  • bilahn

    Interesting Trump left out his friends Putin and Duterte. Not to mention himself.

    • HighInformationVoter

      Rodrigo Duterte is a hero in the Philippines. No wonder American Leftists hate him but love Chavez and Castro.

      • bilahn

        I am not of the Left or the Right – i think Duterte, Kim, Chavez, Castro, Putin, Maduro, Erdogan, and TRUMP are all scoundrels – whether they be from the Left or the RIght, they are all terrible people. They all portray themselves as saviors – and they all bring nothing but power to themselves and ruination to their countries. And yes that includes our own Dear Leader.

        • HighInformationVoter

          Deport yourself.

  • R J Ault

    Yes, indeed, a triumph! Threaten nuclear war and call your adversaries names like a fourth grader. What else would one expect from a none-too-bright, utterly incompetent clown

    • odys

      Barry is no longer president. skippy.

      • R J Ault

        Well, “skippy” you might be surprised that I think “Barry” was a lousy President whose foreign policy was based on a desire to find countries to apologize to! However, he wasn’t – semi-literate, lazy, a serial sexual predator, a racist, and likely Russian agent of influence – as is the current incumbent. I am a Reagan Republican and if the Gipper were alive he would throw up at the thought of this incompetent pig being President. Many good American voted for Trump having been taken in by his con.

        • Yoda0060

          You’re clearly too dumb for words “skippy”.

          • R J Ault

            Wow, I’m wounded. Being called stupid by a brain dead Trump zombie. I’ll never get over it

          • Historybuff

            Hehehe, yea… the trumpers are a hoot.
            HB

          • rex bannister

            Go drink down some metamucil and take a huge bowel movement. Who knows, might help you relax.

          • CJ

            Yes, but his argument was so compelling!

    • HighInformationVoter

      That “incompetent clown” destroyed your political party and has undone 25% of Obama’s “accomplishments” in only 8 months. Get back to us in 2020 when you run Hillary again (it’s her turn!).

  • The speech was good except for the aspect on Korea where Trump demonstrated to the world that he has no plan to stop nuclear proliferation. Thus, since the US is the de facto world leader for anti-proliferation efforts, there will be nuclear proliferation.

    And nuclear proliferation will be a downfall lie have never seen. As such, this was not a great speech except to mark he moment in time where the civilized West categorically condemned itself to suicide.

  • Californiasailor
  • LastBestHope

    President Trump’s heroic attempt to restore American sovereignty .. and by extension the sovereignty of every nation state founded on the principles of individual freedom .. is an effort worthy of our 1776 revolution.

    His success will be the salvation of Western civilization.

    • Marilyn Curtis

      It is a populist movement that will go forward and he is only one man. He was the only candidate for president offering this agenda to #MAGA. It was a sign of sanity and law and order. So, the cronies and crooks are trying with help of their mockingbird media to unseat him as president. He isn’t perfect but he is doing what he can to bravely turn this ship away from globalism, Marxism, communism, toward sovereignty we have been known for but have lost. It isn’t easy or quick to undue decades of federal corruption and theft of our tax dollars. He isn’t a saint but he is on the team of sovereignty. If he doesn’t make accomplishments happen as his campaign promised, there are others’ that will run and win with the same agenda. Trump derangement syndrome colors Americans views but in the eyes of others in the western world, such as Poland, he is a hero.

  • P`tar

    Insane

  • Trapper John

    The man is an embarrassment. Beyond that he doesn’t care at all about our founding principles of liberty, equality, or democracy. The greatest threat to our own sovereignty and democracy recently has been Russia and he still refuses to accept that. Of course that’s probably because as we now know with Manafort, people from his campaign were offering to give private briefings on the election to Russian oligarchs with ties to Putin. Sadly, there is nothing this president could ask me to do as a citizen that I would oblige. He’s morally bankrupt and as I see it the greatest single threat our democracy has faced since WW2.

  • longlance

    Donald Trump has proven himself to be nothing more than a sock-puppet of AIPAC, Wall Street & the national security state.

  • Rich K

    The last part was a bit too polemic for me but I get the point.

  • mickey_moussaoui

    Watching liberal heads explode IS FREAKING HILARIOUS.

  • twopartysystem1

    Great speech, Mr. President!!

  • John Morris

    I’d have liked to have seen the U.N. called out as the defective idea it is. Think about it, it was designed around the idea that each Nation State would have one vote and that pretty much all Nation States would be invited to participate. At the time the U.N. was founded and every day since it has been true that most Nation States are unfree. It is a Parliament of Tyrants.

    Trump should call them out on that, then call for a Reformation so that it can rise above its sordid Communist beginnings and finally become useful.

  • Historybuff

    LOL !

    Mr. Kimball has never heard a trump lie that he did not think was a ‘triump’. Kimball says…

    “We have a policy of principled realism…”

    The statement defies description. It is just another made up phrase of trumpy gobbledygook.
    HB

  • DisgustedwithElitism

    ‘In a little-known comment near the end of the tumultuous 1920s — the decade which brought us a brutal civil war in Russia and a great deal of nationalist upheaval in Eastern Europe, including Ukraine — British Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin reflected that what was really required in the wake of the First World War was not so much the determination “to make the world safe for democracy,” as President Wilson argued [on April 2, 1917, before a joint session of Congress to seek a Declaration of War against Germany], but rather the determination “to make democracy safe for the world.”’

    from “What the History of the World Wars Can Tell Us About the Deeper Struggles at Work in Iraq” (www. huffingtonpost. com/ david-woolner/ what-the-history-of-the-iraq_b_5515288.html)

    And this…

    “There is a wind of nationalism and freedom blowing round the world, and blowing as strongly in Asia as elsewhere.” Stanley Baldiwn (www. quoteswave. com/ text-quotes/ 401055#LbeIhMPXt4CYwfeO.99)

    There is much to like in the observations of PM Stanley Baldwin, now being echoed by President Donald Trump.

  • Cybergeezer

    Mr. Kimball, I consider you a “fresh breeze” in a menagerie of garbage journalism.
    And I really love how you kick over an ant hill, and stir up the vermin enough to soil themselves with vitriol.

  • See Hell…Van Horn(e)

    The TROUBLES TODAY can be ascertained as I disagree with CHESTERTON, in that the questions must be asked; What kind of PatrioTisM,…After-aLL there are severaL kinds,…misTaKeN FooL’s PriDe, and or adaMaNT Carataking concerning over one’s Neighbours and oTheRs as This is deTerministic as to the HeaLTh PsychosociaLLy or MenTaLLy,…one might say InTeLLecTuaLLy,,…As if that those are good,…one’s own Too, as the apt learned, will be the beTTer for iT.
    But PaTrioTisM from rage such as drunkard low inteLLigence kinds always used to show and still do sadly, Right or WronG my Way or the HighwaY, I am always riGhT Types, I can do no wrong kinds, are like lemmings and worse they generally blame all save themselves after madness rots the good wood branch trunk & rooT! Society destroying PaTrioTs.
    Pride comes before the fall…
    LeT me suMMariZe in saying summize the thoughts around M ScoTT Peck, MD’s definitions and arguments around “SpeciaLisTs, and SpeciaLizaTioNists” “GroUp DyNaMiCs Mass HysTeriA UniForMs & Add the proBleMs speLLed ouT in AniMaL FaRm the book by George Orwell…