Is Immigration Still the Operative Term?

By | 2017-04-11T18:47:11+00:00 March 27th, 2017|
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We’ve been asked by Democrats and some Republicans to live with massive waves of immigration. But at some point immigration doesn’t begin to describe what’s happening, both with illegal and legal immigration.

Let’s call it what it is. A variation of colonization that I call neo-colonization.

Here’s the difference. Immigration in the past has meant that people arrive in the host country, assimilate into its population, share its values and join in the defense of its people as they adopt them as their own. If you come to America you become American.

 

In the past colonization also meant something different. The colonist arrives to establish his own separate and distinct enclaves and communities. Think of the British having tiffin and reading the Times of London in India or Singapore. They maintained their own language, religion and laws, and largely kept to themselves. Or, if they mingled with the natives, it was to advance the culture of the colonial power, to which the natives were asked to adapt. Millions of Indians learned English and the Common Law that way, and that was no bad thing.

What’s going on now is very different. The direction of migration has changed, and now it’s the colonials who are migrating to the former imperial power, or to countries like America which never had a knack for imperialism. That’s why this needs a new label: neo-colonialism.

In 19th century European colonialism, the colonizing populations followed the armies. In 21st century neo-colonialism, the colonizing populations precede the armies.

One might ask, what armies?  But as we have seen in abundance in Europe and in growing evidence in North America, the individual enforcers and warriors of these para-military armies have arrived—and their numbers are growing.

In the infiltration from “south of the border,” these paramilitaries self-identify as narco-gangs, transnational crime syndicates and drug lords. They are heavily financed and heavily armed—in many cases in possession of greater firepower than local police.

In the infiltration from the Middle-East and North Africa, these proto-armies self identify as Islamic apocalyptic jihadists of various stripes. Some are directed from foreign states (Iran) or quasi-states (Islamic Caliphate). Many are simply self-radicalized by their own interpretations of ancient scriptural texts, encouraged and inspired by imams preaching from within the neo-colonial settlement.

What all these enforcers, jihadists, gang bangers, organized criminal syndicates and mini-armies share is zero allegiance to the host country, contempt for the laws and culture of the host country, disregard for the inhabitants of the host country and the intention of establishing permanent, alternate settlement and de facto political control within the national boundaries of the host country.

Witness the so-called “No Go Zones” all across Western Europe. In theory these zones remain within the political, legal jurisdiction and control of the host country. But in reality citizens of the host country rarely access these zones, and when they do, it’s only on terms set by the neo-colonizers themselves. Police, by and large, stay out—ceding these zones to the alien law of the enclave population. If and when police are required to enter these zones, such as when it was imperative to track down the terrorists who bombed the Brussels airport, they can only do so as heavily armed SWAT or paramilitary teams, which must then be hastily extruded after the specific operation.

Over the past decade the neo-colonial settlement of Europe has proceeded apace, with notorious “No Go Zones” in Molenbeek, Belgium; Rinkeby and Husby in Sweden; Preston in the U.K.; Gelsenkirchen and Duisburg in Germany; more than nine hundred areas across Europe. Once tranquil Sweden now endures the sad sobriquet of the rape capital of Europe.

It also spills over to people within the “No Go Zone.” Last week’s Islamic murderer in London was home-grown but spent time in Birmingham, which some have described as a “No Go Zone.”

This has not been confined to Europe. Though not yet as autonomous and entrenched as their European counterparts, more than two dozen enclaves have taken root, in Texas, South Carolina, Georgia, California, Virginia, New York, and especially in Dearborn, Michigan, where much of the resettled population is governed by Sharia Law.

The enforcers and jihadists, not content to remain within the confines of their own “No Go Zones,” are putting the host nation and its people on notice. “This is no longer your country,” they are saying. “It’s ours.” This is the endgame of the colonial enterprise—conquest.

Colonialism is politically incorrect these days, but the British who brought their institutions to India left it a better country. The former colonies of Singapore and Hong Kong regularly score at the top of measures of economic freedom. Neo-colonialism represents a reversion to the colonist’s culture, as well as a betrayal of American nationhood.

That’s why our sanctuary cities are seditious, outlaw cities, protecting and fostering foreign influence and infiltration, introducing alien law.

Donald Trump has courageously taken a stand against illegal immigration. That’s just a start, however. If the sanctuary cities want to pretend they’re not part of America, they can’t complain when federal aid is denied them.

 

About the Author:

Rabelais
Rabelais is the nom de plume of a writer living in the heartland.