Boris Zelkin

About Boris Zelkin

Russian born Boris Zelkin is an Emmy Award-winning composer who has written the music to countless films, documentaries, television shows and major sporting events, including the upcoming Gosnell movie, “FrackNation,” Citizen United’s “Rediscovering God in America II,” Roger Simon’s “Lies and Whispers,” the America's Cup, the Masters, the World Skating Championships, the U.S. Open, NASCAR, the Stanley Cup Championship, and the theme to ESPN’s NCAA championship coverage. Zelkin received his B.A. from Colgate University and received his M.A. in religion from the University of Chicago Divinity School. He has written extensively on the culture for various online journals and was a major contributor to the recently released “Bond Forever,” a book about the James Bond franchise. He currently resides in Los Angeles.

Of Memos and Pitchforks

James Damore had to be fired. There was no way around it. He spoke out, eloquently, against orthodoxy and if history is any guide, he'll be lucky to escape with merely a loss of employment. I'm less disconsolate about his ouster—as that was a foregone conclusion—as I am troubled by the cultural tempest

By | 2017-08-14T17:35:12+00:00 August 11th, 2017|

Solving Google’s Censorship Problem Will Be a Trial

Someone must have been telling lies about Jordan Peterson, he knew he had done nothing wrong but, one morning, he was locked out of his Google accounts. He’d had those accounts for 15 years, which included a popular YouTube channel where he posted hundreds of videos and attracted more than 367,000 subscribers. But now

By | 2017-08-09T09:56:35+00:00 August 4th, 2017|

To Hell in a Handmaid’s Basket

Unlike Norm Macdonald, I enjoyed Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale. But then again, I’m a sucker for dystopian stories. From Animal Farm, 1984, Fahrenheit 451 and Brave New World, to Kafka’s The Trial, dystopian narrative plumbs the visceral fear that individuals have in response to the rise of the modern state, especially as the

By | 2017-06-01T19:32:54+00:00 May 29th, 2017|

Hollywood’s Dialogue Problem

I’ve worked in Hollywood for over 20 years and have always been skeptical when some of my more conservative friends have charged that the Hollywood elite discriminate against those with conservative viewpoints. This charge, I felt, was unwarranted. Sure, we all like to get along with the people we work with, but here

By | 2017-05-10T19:09:38+00:00 May 4th, 2017|

Activists Appropriate Holiday Spirit for Political Purposes

It’s the same, every year. If our most cherished holidays aren’t denigrated falsely as pagan anachronisms, they’re indicted as examples of naked consumerism. As Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, or even Easter and Christmas roll around, one can reliably count on the chorus of cynics ever ready with limitless reserves of smug

By | 2017-05-14T15:01:32+00:00 April 20th, 2017|

Harry Potter and the Danger of Words

“Avada Kedavra!” —Voldemort It must have been J. K. Rowling. That’s the only explanation that makes sense. Rowling, with her Harry Potter series, somehow convinced a generation of kids that words, spoken in just the right sequence, can affect the physical world in exactly the same way force can. After exhausting every other rational explanation,

By | 2017-03-09T08:17:03+00:00 March 9th, 2017|

The Denunciation Racket

Maybe it’s my background as a Soviet-era Jewish Russian emigre, but I’ve always found calls from politicians to denounce someone or something unsettling. From the days of Ancient Rome when senators would pressure each other to out-denounce political enemies to appease the emperor, to the French Revolution where the Sans-Culottes pamphlets read: “Denounce the crimes,

By | 2017-03-04T09:54:09+00:00 March 3rd, 2017|

The New York Times Cites Italian Thinker Who Inspired Fascists

Italian philosopher, Julius Evola. Cited by The New York Times. The New York Times recently published an article that was, at best a poorly done hit piece; or, at worst, a poorly done piece that gives us insight into the paper's view of the dangers of uncurated knowledge. Jason Horowitz thinks he has the goods

By | 2017-02-15T15:39:37+00:00 February 15th, 2017|